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Alderwood

Allenby

Allenby is very popular with families that have young children. This neighbourhood's biggest draw is the Allenby Public School which has an excellent reputation, built around its French Immersion program for students in grades one through six.

Annex

The Annex is Toronto's most heterogenous community. Its residents include successful business people, prominent artists, University of Toronto students and faculty, and people from all walks of life. This is a vibrant neighbourhood that draws its energy from the University of Toronto, as well as from the bars, restaurants and nightclubs that crowd together along Bloor Street. Many of the rooming houses and multi-unit homes in the Annex have recently been converted back to single family houses reflecting the return to prominence of this historic Toronto neighbourhood. The Annex houses, built between 1880 and 1910 are fine examples of Victorian, Queen Anne and Richardsonian Romanesque architectural styles. Plum and pink colored Credit River sandstone, rich red brick, and terra cotta clay tiles, make up the exterior facades of many of these homes. The architectural detail is among the finest in the city, ranging from pyramidal roofs and turrets to recessed grand archways and wooden spindled porches. A second wave of Annex homes dates from 1910 to 1930. These homes are less elaborate than their predecessors, but are nonetheless fine examples of English Cottage, Georgian and Tudor style architecture. The Annex's main shopping district is on Bloor Street. This stretch of stores includes a hodgepodge of clothing boutiques, bookstores, food markets, travel agencies, restaurants, and outdoor cafes. The Mirvish Village shopping district on Markham Street, south of Bloor Street, is a quaint collection of bookstores, art galleries, antique stores, and one-of-a-kind specialty stores. The Annex really comes alive at night when people from all over the city converge upon its restaurants, bars and nightclubs. Fitness enthusiasts can get in shape at either the University of Toronto's Athletic Centre, or the Jewish Community Centre at Bloor and Spadina. The Native Canadian Centre of Toronto is located in the Annex at 16 Spadina Road. This centre offers a variety of programs and services for Toronto's Native community as well as the general public. The Spadina Road Public Library at 10 Spadina Road, offers a wide variety of programming for neighbourhood residents. The Annex is well served by public transit. There are subway stations both at Spadina and at Bathurst on the Bloor-Danforth line, and at Dupont Street, on the Yonge-University-Spadina line.

Description provided by Torontoneighbourhoods.net
The Annex is located in Toronto Real Estate Board District C02.
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Anten Mills

Anten Mills is centred on the intersection of Horseshoe Valley Road West (formally County Road 22) and Wilson Drive (formally the 7th Concession of Vespra), 15 kilometres (9.3 mi) northwest of Barrie. The community derived its name from a well known mill operating in the area in the late 1800s. The first syllables of this firm's name, Anderson & Tennant, after its owners Charles Anderson and a Mr. Tennant, were merged to create the word Anten. Most of the workforce living in Anten Mills are employed in nearby Barrie. The area surrounding Anten Mills is predominantly either farm or ; however, golf courses, ski resorts and hiking trails also dot the landscape. A further 25 km northwest of Anten Mills is , a popular summer tourist attraction. star grew up in Anten Mills.

Baby Point

The historic stone gates at the corner of Jane Street and Baby Point Road mark the entrance to this exclusive west end neighbourhood. Baby Point is situated on a peninsula of land overlooking the Humber River. It is surrounded by ravine and parkland and is one of the prettiest settings in Toronto. Fall Salmon Fishing in the Humber River at the Old Mill is fun for anglers and spectators alike. Without a doubt one of the prettiest settings in Toronto has to be at the Humber River as it flows alongside Etienne Brule Park just below the historic Old Mill Inn and Spa. This is the setting every fall around Thanksgiving for dozens of anglers. These fishing enthusiasts wade with their leg high rubber boots into the chilly waters of the Humber River to test their mettle against the teeming amount of Salmon swimming upstream to spawning grounds. Fishermen are not the only ones who gather here on a nice fall day. Curious onlookers also line the banks of the Humber river to marvel at this spectacle; as hundreds of Salmon attempt to jump the weir in the Humber river. These schools of Salmon travel this route each fall as they make their way up the river from the mouth of Lake Ontario to spawn upstream in the Humber River headwaters which originate all the way up in the Oak Ridges Moraine. This is not a recent discovery as far as fishing holes go. Salmon have been migrating along the river for thousands of years. The First Nations people fished here long before the settlement of Toronto. The Humber River was officially designated a Canadian Heritage River at a plaque unveiling ceremony in Toronto on September 24, 1999. The beautiful Old Mill bridge, built in 1916, is the perfect backdrop for all the fishing enthusiasts. A short stroll from the bridge is the Old Mill Inn and Spa. This historic Inn has a very popular Sunday brunch and family dinner buffet, as well as a famous Thanksgiving Buffet. Good to know just in case you get hungry after a busy day watching the Salmon run. If you prefer a more casual outing, Etienne Brule Park has numerous picnic benches. This park is a short stroll from the Old Mill subway station. If you are traveling by car there is plenty of parking available at the entrance to the park.

Bathurst Manor

This large Toronto neighbourhood, stretches from Steeles in the north to Sheppard in the south. The western boundary is Allen Road and Dufferin, and the eastern boundary zigs and zags, roughly following the course of the Don River through G. Ross Lord Park, the West Don Parkland, the Carscadden Greenbelt, and the Hinder Property. Bathurst Manor is largely residential, with the area’s shopping clustering mainly along Sheppard, especially in Sheppard Plaza. There are lots of parks and schools in the neighbourhood to serve the large number of families that live here, and the area is serviced by multiple transit routes that make it easy to get around. The area is filled with activity during the day, but is quiet during the evenings. The quiet neighbourhood is filled with families and a strong sense of community. Parks, playgrounds, and community centres all see good use, and there are lots of schools in the area. Sheppard Plaza and other shopping areas are busy in the daytime, but the neighbourhood is fairly quiet at night. It’s easy to get around Bathurst Manor by transit and by car. Downsview subway station sits at the southwest corner of the neighbourhood, and there are multiple bus routes running through the neighbourhood as well as along its borders. The Allen Expressway provides a great route for drivers to get to other parts of the city. The parks and green space make Bathurst Manor attractive, as does the easy access to TTC.

Bay Street Corridor

Known as the heart of Toronto’s financial district and the city’s equivalent of Wall Street, Bay Street is also in the middle of Toronto’s cultural, scientific, educational and political spheres. The area also has a colourful history that serves as a microcosm of world history. Originally part of a neighbourhood known as The Ward, Bay Street has been home to those fleeing the European Revolutions of 1848 and the Irish Potato Famine, slaves escaping the US via the Underground Revolution and many escaping the Russian Revolution in 1917. The area was also the original home of Toronto’s Jewish community, and then served as part of the city’s original Chinatown and Little Italy neighbourhoods. Today, Bay Street stretches from Lake Ontario in the south to Davenport Road in the north. Along the way, the street passes by everything from City Hall to the Eaton Centre to the University of Toronto, one of the reasons why the area has evolved into one of Toronto’s prime condo markets. Many young professionals live in this neighbourhood, attracted by being at ground zero for law firms, investment banks and Canada’s economic movers and shakers. Not surprisingly, it is also home to the TSX, one of the world’s leading stock exchanges.

Bayview Village

The Bayview Village community revolves around three popular local landmarks - the Bayview Village Shopping Centre, the North York YMCA, and the East Don Valley Parklands - each of which is an integral part of this family oriented neighbourhood.

The design and layout of Bayview Village is very much influenced by the East Don Valley Parklands. Dr E.G. Faludi, the town planner who designed Bayview Village, recognized the importance of the East Don Valley Parklands when he said "We will fit the community into the landscape and not the landscape into the community." This lofty ideal was met in Bayview Village. Bayview Village's winding streets and cul-de-sacs are decorated with mature birch, cedar, willow, spruce, and pine trees. Many of the Bayview Village houses are situated on spectacular ravine lots that feature glorious views of the East Don River Valley Parklands. Most Bayview Village homes were built between 1954 and 1964. The mix of housing here includes raised and ranch style bungalows, split-level houses, and Georgian Revival-style homes. There are also a large number of affordable condominium townhouse communities along the west side of Leslie Street that feature playful street names like Tangle Briarway, Thorny Vineway, and Peach Willoway. Bayview Village has many new high-rise condominium buildings that offer a maintenance free lifestyle and plenty of recreational amenities. These sleek concrete and glass buildings are designed to maximize views and sunlight. Most of these include a small balcony. Bayview Village residents do most of their shopping at the Bayview Village Shopping Centre located at the north-east corner of Bayview and Sheppard Avenues. Bayview Village is a nicely designed, intimate shopping centre anchored by a large upscale supermarket and a department store. This popular shopping centre also contains an excellent selection of fashion, gift, and specialty stores, as well as family style restaurants. Sheppard and Finch Avenues, and Leslie Street all contain small outdoor shopping plazas that feature mostly small, independent retailers, restaurants, and professional offices. Many of these businesses include English and Chinese on their signage, reflecting the large Chinese population living in and around Bayview Village. Sheppard Avenue also has a number of well known big box stores and a large medical centre. The North York YMCA, located at 567 Sheppard Avenue East, is the largest recreational facility serving this neighbourhood. Some of the programs being offered at this YMCA include playgym and swim lessons for preschoolers, gymnastics, karate, swimming and basketball programs for children, and aerobics, yoga and aquafit for adults. Facilities at this centre include a gymnasium, a dance studio, a conditioning room, a main swimming pool with lanes and a training swimming pool. The East Don Parklands Trail winds its way through the centre of this neighbourhood from Finch Avenue down to Sheppard Avenue. From Sheppard Avenue south to Duncan Mills Road this trail is paved and is known as the Betty Sutherland trail, named after a long serving municipal councillor from this area. The Bayview Village Shopping Centre is a popular recreation spot for residents of this neighbourhood. This shopping centre stages a variety of special events throughout the year including a fashion show, and an antique and collectible show. The Bayview Village Shopping Centre also has a public library, a health spa, and four movie theatres. There is regular bus service on Finch and Sheppard Avenues and limited bus service on Bayview Avenue and Leslie Street. All these bus lines provide connecting routes to stations on the Yonge-University-Spadina subway line. Motorists are approximately twenty-five minutes from downtown via Yonge Street or Bayview Avenue. On-ramps to Highway 401 are located off of Bayview Avenue, Yonge Street and Leslie Street.
Description provided by Torontoneighbourhoods.net
Bayview Village is located within Toronto Real Estate Board District C15.
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Bayview Woods - Steeles

Bayview Woods-Steeles is a neighbourhood located in the northern tip of the city of Toronto, Ontario, Canada, formerly in North York before it was amalgamated into Toronto in 1998. It is part of federal and provincial electoral district Willowdale, and Toronto electoral ward 24: Willowdale (East). The area is divided by a series of ravines, and is often not considered a neighbourhood unto itself. Rather the sections are more often divided between the neighbouring areas of Hillcrest Village, Bayview Village, and Newtonbrook. The neighbourhood is bordered by Steeles Avenue East to the north, Leslie Street to the east, Bayview Avenue to the west, and Finch Avenue East to the south. Several branches of the Don River meet in the middle of this neighbourhood and there is no shortage of greenspace as a result, though much is not usable, since it consists mostly of ravines. This neighbourhood is also notable for varying greatly in elevation, with the section in Cummer Avenue between Bayview and Leslie being especially steep. Some of the schools in the area include Steelesview Public School, Zion Heights Junior High School, and Pineway Public school. The neighbourhood also has a chiropractic college located on Leslie Street. Two public secondary schools serve the area: A. Y. Jackson Secondary School and Earl Haig Secondary School. Notable areas of interest include the Cummer Park Community Centre which has a swimming pool, an arena and a skate park (one of the very few that exists in Toronto). There are also many ravines in the area which are used for walking, running and cycling.

Beaconsfield Village

Bedford Park

The Bedford Park neighbourhood is geared toward families with young children. It has an excellent selection of public, private and separate schools, many parkettes and playgrounds, a community centre, a library, and convenient access to Toronto's transit system.

Bedford Park has a good mix of detached and semi-detached homes. The original housing stock was built between 1890 and 1940. However, many of the bungalows in the neighbourhood have recently been torn down and replaced with custom designed houses. Wanless Park is the largest park in the neighbourhood. It has five floodlit tennis courts, a basketball court, a baseball diamond, a tots playground and a wading pool. Wanless Park is close to the Bedford Park Community Centre. Located at the Bedford Park Public School this Community Centre includes a gymnasium and an indoor pool. The Woburn parkette, west of Yonge street, is a popular destination point for neighbourhood parents with toddlers and preschoolers. It features a new tots playground and a wading pool. A few blocks north of the Woburn Parkette is The Fairlawn Neighbourhood Centre, which operates out of the Fairlawn Heights United Church. This centre includes seasonal programming for residents of all ages. The George Locke Public Library at the south-east corner of Yonge and Lawrence, offers year round programs for adults, children, and preschoolers. The Fairlawn Neighbourhood Centre (FNC) is a unique place -offering a broad range of programming for all ages targeted to their 2500 active members. The Centre has become a hub of the community and is often the first place that new families visit when they move into the neighbourhood. You can check out their programs are www.fairlawnneighbourhoodcentre.com. The Lawrence subway station off Yonge Street is within reasonable walking distance of all the homes in this neighbourhood. There is also regular bus service on Yonge Street, as well as limited service on both Avenue Road, and Mount Pleasant Road. Motorists are twenty minutes from downtown and approximately five minutes from the Yonge Street on-ramp to Highway 401.
Description provided by Torontoneighbourhoods.net
Bedford Park is located within Toronto Real Estate Board District C04.
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Bennington Heights

Bennington Heights is one of Toronto's most exclusive and expensive neighbourhoods. Over the years it has been the home of many prominent Torontonians including author Margaret Atwood, whose highly acclaimed novel Cat's eye, is loosely based on her childhood growing up in Bennington Heights.

Bennington Heights is bound on two sides by the bluffs of the Don River Valley ravine and on the north by Mount Pleasant Cemetery. These natural barriers help preserve the peaceful tranquility of this neighbourhood. Bennington Heights English Manor stone houses were built in the 1920's and 1930's. The Cottage style two-storey homes and bungalows were built in the late 1940's and early 1950's. Bennington Heights' winding roads, culs-de-sac and ravine properties all add to the charm of owning a home in this neighbourhood. With so much nature at your doorstep don't be surprised if you spot a fox gingerly taking an afternoon stroll through Bennington Heights as I had the pleasure of witnessing while touring this neighbourhood. Bennington Heights residents can shop for all of their household needs at the mall located on the south-east corner of Bayview and Moore Avenues. This mall features a popular grocery store, a large pharmacy and a bank. Further north on Bayview Avenue is the Leaside shopping district which contains an excellent selection of specialty stores, food shops and restaurants. Bennington Park, located off of Bayview Heights Drive, has a nice view of the Don River Valley. This park is the home of the Bennington Heights Tennis Club which has two tennis courts. Next to the park is the Bennington Heights School. The school's recreational facilities include a soccer field, two baseball diamonds, and a large children's playground. Evergreen Gardens Park, off of Moore Avenue also has a children's playground. Nature lovers and fitness enthusiasts can access the Moore Park Ravine walking trail from Moore Avenue east of Hudson Drive or from the Bayview Avenue extension. The Moore Park trail is a remnant of the former Belt Line Railway, a commuter train that serviced Toronto in the early 1890's. The Moore Avenue bus connects passengers to the St. Clair station on the Yonge-University-Spadina subway line. Motorists can hop on the Bayview extension which will usher them downtown in minutes or provide access to the Don Valley Parkway and a network of connecting highways leading into and out of the city.
Description provided by Torontoneighbourhoods.net
Bennington Heights is located within Toronto Real Estate Board District C09 and C11.
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Birchcliffe

Bloor West Village

Bloor West Village is a shopping district in Toronto, located along Bloor Street, it encompasses all businesses along Bloor Street between Jane Street and Ellis Park Road, consisting of more than 400 shops, restaurants and services. The mix of stores include specialty clothing stores, book stores, restaurants and cafes. The businesses organized in 1970 into the first mandatory business improvement district, an idea that has spread to numerous other commercial streets in Toronto and to cities around the world. Bloor West Village is located north of Swansea, a former village dating to the 19th century. Bloor West Village is also considered the name of the immediate vicinity of Bloor Street. in May 1968, the Bloor–Danforth subway line opened in the area, allowing shoppers to shop downtown instead of the businesses along Bloor Street. Competition was also developing from enclosed shopping centres. Businessmen of the district attempted to set up a business association to pay for improvements to the area, but received only partial support from businesses in the area, and not enough to pay the estimated expenses to renovate and market the area. The businessmen lobbied the Toronto and Ontario governments for legislation to compel all business owners within a designated area to pay towards improvements, as directed by an elected body. The Ontario Municipal Act was amended in 1970 and the Bloor West Village Business Improvement Association (BIA) was founded as the first of its kind in the world, first chaired by Alex Ling. In 1980, Ling founded the Toronto Association of Business Improvement Areas (TABIA), an organization that now represents 66 BIAs across Toronto. Ling was chairman of the Bloor West Village BIA for 24 years. The organization promotes business activity in the area by holding several annual events and festivals. It also puts efforts into the beautification of the area. The BIA hosts: - Annual Ukrainian Festival in September (music, foods and crafts). - July Festival, which is a local fair of amusements and entertainment. - Halloween Festival on Armadale Avenue, Beresford Avenue and Glendonwynne Road (family-friendly activities). -Participates in the Toronto city-wide "Cavalcade of Lights" (December)

Briar Hill

Briar Hill (often referred to as Briar Hill-Belgravia) is often spoken of as part of the larger “Fairbank” neighbourhood, though the City of Toronto recognizes it separately. The area borders Eglinton West to the South, Marlee Avenue to the East, CN Rail Lines to the West (or Caledonia Road) and Briar Hill to the North. Briar Hill's affordability and proximity to public transit make it a popular choice for young families. Marlee and Dufferin are rapidly changing and the mix of stores is improving. A vast number of custom homes have been built in the area over the last 5 years.

Broadview North

Broadview North is a central Toronto neighbourhood which offers its residents unprecedented access to trails and the ravine. The area is known for its population of arts, culture, and recreational sporting enthusiasts. It is a diverse neighbourhood notable for a high number of Greek, Turkish, Serbian and Japanese speakers. The area is walking distance to the Danforth and provides quick access to the Bayview extension and the DVP. Evergreen Brick Works is a favourite nearby attraction, they host a tremendous fresh produce market on weekends and have skating during the winter. You will also find Toddmorden mills heritage site within this area, as well as the Fantasy Farm which hosts gorgeous weddings.

Cabbagetown

Cabbagetown is one of Toronto's most popular neighbourhoods. Its residents come from a wide variety of backgrounds, however they all share a strong sense of community spirit and pride in their neighbourhood. This community spirit is put on display every September during the Cabbagetown Fall Festival that runs for an entire weekend and features a mini marathon, historical walking tours, a parade and a community wide yard sale. The Cabbagetown neighbourhood was once described by the New York Times as "containing the largest collection of Victorian homes in North America". Cabbagetown's houses were built between 1860 and 1895. Most of these houses have been lovingly restored under the watchful eye of the Cabbagetown Preservation Association. The Association, comprised of local residents, plays a vital role in ensuring that all Cabbagetown renovations and new developments are in keeping with this historical neighbourhood. The 'Old Cabbagetown' shopping district on Parliament Street features many one-of-a-kind shops and a vast array of restaurants. The Carlton Street shopping district is similar in tone to Parliament Street, but on a much smaller scale. Cabbagetown also has small retail pockets on Gerrard Street, Sherbourne Street, and Wellesley Avenue. Cabbagetown's recreational centre is Riverdale Park. This park is the home of Riverdale Farm. Riverdale Farm is modelled after a late 19th century Victorian farm and includes horses, cows, pigs, sheep, goats, chickens, geese and ducks. Riverdale farm is open seven days a week and admission is free. Riverdale Park also contains sports fields and serves as an access point to the Lower Don Recreation Trail. The Cabbagetown Community Arts Centre on Parliament Street has music, drama and dance programs for children. The Cabbagetown Youth Centre on Lancaster Avenue offers sports, and arts and crafts programs. Cabbagetown's Public Library is located at the corner of Gerrard Street and Parliament. The Sherbourne bus and Parliament streetcar connect passengers to stations on the Bloor-Danforth subway line. The Wellesley and Carlton Street buses connect commuters to the Yonge-University-Spadina subway line. For motorists, the Don Valley Parkway is approximately five minutes away, while Toronto's downtown business and entertainment districts are less than ten minutes from Cabbagetown.

Description provided by Torontoneighbourhoods.net
Cabbagetown is located in the Toronto Real Estate Board District C08.
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Caledon

Caledon is best known for its spectacular landscape and dazzling topography. Caledon’s beauty stems from its two dominant landforms, the Niagara Escarpment and the Oak Ridges Moraine which converge in the Caledon Hills to form a landscape aesthetic that is unparalleled in the Greater Toronto Area. Caledon is renowned for its unspoiled beauty and its abundance of conservation lands. In terms of size, Caledon is one of the largest municipalities in the Greater Toronto Area; however, it is predominantly rural, and has a very low population density. The main urban centres in this town are: Bolton, Caledon East, Caledon Village, and Mayfield West. Caledon also includes numerous rural hamlets where time seems to have stood still in this unspoiled countryside.

Caribou Park

Caribou Park has its history embedded in farming as most prestigious neighbourhoods in Toronto do. It was originally part of a farm owned by early settler Thomas Snider, who owned the farm from the 1830s to the 1870s and was called the Snider farm. The Snider farm encompassed Caribou Park neighbourhood all the way to the west end of Bathurst Street. The residential development of Caribou Park did not commence until the 1930s. Today, Caribou Park is a neighbourhood that is surrounded by mature trees and landscaping, green and lush landscape and a ravine with a creek. For this reason, it’s no wonder that many of the street names in this neighbourhood include natural elements such as Otter Creek, Kimbark, Beaver Street, etc. Caribou Park has two very distinct residential pockets. The Georgian, Tudor, and English Cottage style houses closer to Avenue Road and east of Caribou Park were built in the 1930's and 1940's. The houses along Otter Crescent that back onto the ravine and the Otter Creek are generally situated on premium lots that command the highest prices in the neighbourhood. The split-level houses and ranch style bungalows located west of Caribou Park and closer to Bathurst Street were built in the 1950's and 1960's. Some of these houses have been replaced by modern custom built homes. Many of the homeowners in this area are members of Toronto's Jewish orthodox community that is centred along Bathurst Street. Caribou Park residents enjoy the luxury of being able to walk to the popular shops and restaurants on Avenue Road, north of Lawrence Avenue. This shopping district is anchored by the Pusateri's Food shop which attracts shoppers from all over the city. The mix of stores along Avenue Road includes children's shops, home decorating and furniture stores, clothing stores, antique shops, two large video rental stores, and family style restaurants. Caribou Park residents can also walk to the Bathurst and Lawrence shopping district which is anchored by the Lawrence Plaza at the north-west corner of Bathurst and Lawrence. This shopping plaza attracts shoppers from far and wide to its outstanding collection of discount and outlet stores. Bathurst Street itself contains many fine Jewish food shops and bakeries featuring some of the finest bagels in town. The Caribou neighbourhood park is conveniently located right in the centre of this neighbourhood off Caribou Drive. This park features a popular children's playground. Otter Creek Park is located just east of Avenue Road off Cheritan Avenue. This fitness oriented park includes four tennis courts that are retrofitted for use as an artificial ice rink in the wintertime. Otter Creek also provides access to the Chatsworth ravine which contains a nature trail. The ultra-modern Barbara Frum Public Library at 20 Covington Road includes a children's story room, French and multicultural collections, and an auditorium with a 150 person seating capacity. This library is combined with a 10,000 square foot recreation centre that contains multi-purpose rooms, a kitchen/craft room and meeting rooms.

Casa Loma

The striking silhouette of Casa Loma provides a romantic backdrop to this posh Toronto neighbourhood. Nestled on the brow of the Avenue Road Hill, and surrounded by ravines and parkland, this residential enclave looks and feels more like an enchanted forest filled with storybook homes, than the big city neighbourhood it really is.

Casa Loma's large Tudor, Georgian, Edwardian, and English Cottage style homes were built mostly between 1905 and 1940. The houses on the south side of Lyndhurst Court enjoy a spectacular view of Toronto's skyline and Lake Ontario. Many homes in this neighbourhood back onto the Nordheimer ravine, a virtual forest of mature oak and maple trees. In addition to single family houses, the Casa Loma neighbourhood contains a mix of duplex and triplex houses, luxury townhouses, condominiums and co-ownership apartment buildings. The closest shopping for Casa Loma residents is the Bathurst and St. Clair shopping district. These are mostly convenience type stores that cater to everyday household needs. Gourmet food shops, high end boutiques, and all kinds of professional services are available on Spadina Road, north of St. Clair, in the heart of Forest Hill Village. Sir Winston Churchill Park is located at the south-east corner of Spadina Road and St.Clair Avenue. This park has ten floodlit tennis courts, a children's playground, and a popular makeshift running path that skirts the perimeter of the park. Wrapped around Sir Winston Churchill Park is the Nordheimer Ravine. This quiet oasis features a rustic wood path with many excellent picnic spots, and a large variety of trees, plants and wildlife. Wells Hill Park, contains a children's playground and a wading pool. Across the street from this park is the Wells Hill Lawn Bowling Club and the Wychwood Public Library. The local community centre operates out of Hillcrest School and includes an indoor pool and a gymnasium. The Casa Loma neighbourhood is well served by public transit. There is regular bus service on Bathurst Street and streetcar service on St. Clair Avenue West. The St. Clair West subway station is a short walk from the homes in this neighbourhood. For motorists, the main arterial roadways are Bathurst Street and St.Clair Avenue.
Description provided by Torontoneighbourhoods.net
Casa Loma is located in the Toronto Real Estate Board District C03.
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Chaplin Estates

This distinguished neighbourhood has always been one of Toronto's most exclusive addresses. Chaplin Estates homeowners enjoy convenient access to excellent public and private schools, shopping, parks and recreation, and transit service.

Chaplin Estates' two and three storey detached houses are situated on premium lots with private driveways. The houses in this neighbourhood were built in the 1920's and 1930's, and include many fine examples of Tudor, Georgian, and English Cottage style architecture. Chaplin Estates residents are within walking distance of 'The Eglinton Way' shopping district along Eglinton Avenue West. This ritzy shopping area includes high-end fashion boutiques, gourmet food shops, professional offices, restaurants, and the Eglinton movie theatre. The Yonge street shopping district is also within walking distance of Chaplin Estates. This highly visible shopping area includes many one-of-a-kind stores, and trendy restaurants that draw customers from all over the city. The Neshama Playground at Oriole Park, features a water play area, sensory musical features, Braille panels, an enclosed climbing merry-go-round and bounce pad, accessible swings and play structures, and colourful, springy surfacing. The playground was built with the generous support of donors across the city. The ultra modern North Toronto Community Centre has an indoor and outdoor pool, water slides, a gymnasium, a walking track, and exercise rooms. Eglinton Park is adjacent to the community centre. Its facilities include: a baseball diamond, tennis courts, a wading pool and an artificial ice hockey rink. The historic Beltline trail, walking and cycling path, is easily accessed from Oriole Park, at the south end of the neighbourhood. The Northern District branch of the Toronto Public Library, is located on Orchard View Boulevard. This branch offers programs for seniors, adults, and children. Chaplin Estates residents can walk to the bus stops on Yonge Street, Eglinton Avenue, Oriole Parkway, and Chaplin Crescent. The Davisville and the Eglinton subway stations are also within walking distance of this neighbourhood. The main east-west arterial roadway is Eglinton Avenue. Residents are approximately fifteen minutes from the Allen Expressway, and the Don Valley Parkway. Motorists can be downtown in fifteen minutes via Yonge Street or Avenue Road.
Description provided by Torontoneighbourhoods.net
Chaplin Estates is located in Toronto Real Estate District C03.
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Church - Yonge Corridor

There is a large number of rental accommodations in the Church-Yonge Corridor neighbourhood. This reflects the mobility of the population, which is comprised mostly of singles and couples. Ryerson University is helping to reshape Toronto’s downtown east core having recently purchased landmark buildings to expand their campus. One of these acquisitions is the former Maple Leaf Gardens which has been renamed Mattamy Athletic Centre and now serves as the home of the Ryerson University Sports and Recreation Centre. New condo developments are springing up all over the Church-Yonge Corridor which is gradually changing the character of this downtown neighbourhood from urban grit to City chic. Downtown's Victorian houses were built in the mid to late 1800's. Most of these houses have been converted to commercial uses or into multi-family homes. This neighbourhood also contains a large number of fashionable townhouses built in the 1970's and 1980's. The Downtown is where you will find Toronto's most diverse selection of apartment buildings. There are art-deco designed, walk-up apartment buildings from the 1920's, high-rise apartment buildings from the 1950's, and newer luxury condominium apartment buildings, These range from entry level prices to more exclusive residences such as the Windsor Arms condominium where units sell for over one million dollars.

City Place

Clairlea

Clairlea is a quiet, middle-income neighbourhood that features well treed streets and affordable homes. There is plenty of shopping on Warden, Victoria Park and Eglinton Avenues. This is an ideal neighbourhood for commuters as it is well served by public transit and is also within close proximity to the Don Valley Parkway. Clairlea's major landmark is Warden Woods, a deep ravine valley that spans the south-east perimeter of this neighbourhood. The Warden Woods Ravine parkland has a paved trail which offers Clairlea residents a bit of nature close to home.

Collingwood

Collingwood is located within Toronto Real Estate Board District Simcoe.

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Corktown

Corktown is one of the more affordable downtown Toronto neighbourhoods. It has recently become popular with young professionals, who find this location extremely convenient to Toronto's downtown business and entertainment districts.

New and more relaxed zoning bylaws in the Corktown district have resulted in the speedy conversion of many of Corktown's commercial buildings into live-in work studios, condominium lofts and professional offices, all of which has helped to revitalize the entire neighbourhood. Corktown contains some of the oldest Victorian row-houses in Toronto. Some of these houses date back to the 1850's and 1860's. These former workers' cottages can be found on the quaint narrow laneways that are discreetly tucked away off Corktown's main streets. Corktown has also recently experienced a number of retrofit projects on its commercial and industrial buildings. Many of these buildings are currently being recycled as live/work studio lofts that incorporate all of today's modern conveniences. At present, there is only a limited amount of shopping within the immediate Corktown neighbourhood, with most of it centred around the intersection of Queen and Parliament streets. However, Corktown residents do enjoy the luxury of being located within walking distance of the St. Lawrence Market, Toronto's premiere food market. The Sackville playground located along King Street East, has a tot park, a basketball court, and a wading pool. The St. Lawrence Community Centre on the Esplanade, includes squash courts, a swimming pool, a gymnasium, a piano room, a weight room, and a games room. The John Innes Community Recreation Centre on Sherbourne Street, has an indoor swimming pool, a gymnasium, a running track, a weight room, a cardio training room, a games room, a woodworking shop and a craft room. Next door to the community centre is the Moss Park indoor hockey arena. The Queen and King streetcars connect to stations on the Yonge-University-Spadina subway line, while the Parliament streetcar connects passengers to the Castle Frank station on the Bloor-Danforth subway line. Motorists are only a few minutes from the Adelaide Street on ramp to the Don Valley Parkway, and an equally short distance to the Gardiner Expressway and Lake Shore Boulevard.
Description provided by Torontoneighbourhoods.net
Corktown is located in the Toronto Real Estate Board District C08.
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Corso Italia

Corso Italia is one of Toronto’s smallest neighbourhoods. The seemingly aged collection of buildings and retail shops span only a few blocks east from Lansdowne Avenue/Prospect Cemetery to Westmount Avenue and approximately a block north and south from St. Clair Avenue West. Semi-detached and detached two-storey homes line the one-way streets that lead to and from busy St. Clair Avenue West. Set close together with smaller front yards these houses are reminiscent of those found in older areas of the city such as Allenby and North Toronto. Along St. Clair, many retail spaces have apartments above - a fact that allows Corso Italia to have a larger neighbourhood population than meets the eye. Corso Italia is dissected by the St. Clair streetcar line that runs east and west along the street. Current construction on these tracks has led to traffic congestion as cars along with St. Clair Avenue West 512 buses weave amongst construction signs and street-parked cars. The Dufferin Street 329 route also slices through the eastern portion of the neighbourhood. Home to the Corso Italia Fiesta, public transportation is an asset during this summer festival. Food vendors and various mediums of entertainment take over the streets for the length of the festival which has incorporated a multicultural flavour reflecting Toronto’s diversity. Italian, Portuguese and Spanish make up a large portion of the population throughout the neighbourhood; residents of Vietnamese and Chinese ethnicity can also be found here. Not to be confused with the Little Italy to the south, Corso Italia holds on to its Italian heritage through neighbourhood establishments such as The Big Ragu, Tre Mari Bakery and gelaterias; grocers, florists, European fashion and textile shops round out the retail sector of the area. Although its blink-and-you’ll-miss-it size leads some to overlook it, Corso Italia is a neighbourhood worth slowing for.

Crescent Town

Cricket Club

The Cricket Club neighbourhood is an established family oriented community. The local residents display a pride of ownership that can be seen on the manicured lawns and pretty gardens found throughout this neighbourhood. There is a relaxed, country charm ambience here thanks to an abundance of mature trees and the fact that many of the streets do not have sidewalks.

Cricket Club homes are in great demand because of all the amenities that this location has to offer including upscale shopping districts, excellent schools, and close proximity to public transportation and to Highway 401. The Cricket Club neighbourhood contains a nice mix of housing including two and three bedroom bungalows, Tudor and cottage-style two-storey houses, and larger Georgian-style homes with spacious centre hall plans. All of the houses in this neighbourhood have private drives and the lot frontages are generous, varying in size from thirty to fifty feet. The majority of Cricket Club homes were built during the 1920's, 1930's and 1940's. These houses include many decorative features such as pretty bay windows, hardwood floors, fireplaces, french doors, wood trim, and built in cabinetry. Cricket Club residents enjoy some of the best shopping found anywhere in Toronto, along Yonge Street and on Avenue Road. The shops, restaurants, and professional offices on these two streets are located in small two-storey brick buildings that blend in nicely with the residential tone of this neighbourhood. The shopping mix on Yonge Street and on Avenue Road includes designer clothing stores, home furnishing and decorating stores, hairstylists, beauty salons, children's clothing and toy shops, video stores, antique shops, art shops, gourmet coffee shops, bakeries, gift shops, hardware stores, banks, convenience stores, supermarkets, drug and health food stores, dry cleaners, fast food outlets, fine dining restaurants and professional and medical offices. The Armour Heights Community Centre, located at 2141 Avenue Road, offers dance and fitness programs for adults, a tiny tots program, and a children's after-four program. The Armour Heights public library is located in this community centre. For golf enthusiasts, the Don Valley Golf Course is located just north of York Mills off Yonge Street. This public course is set amongst the beautiful scenery of the Don River Valley. Many residents of this neighbourhood spend their recreational time at the Toronto Cricket Skating and Curling Club located at 141 Wilson Avenue. The Cricket Club is one of Toronto's premier private clubs. Its facilities include tennis, squash, skating, curling, cricket, croquet, lawn bowling, aerobics, and swimming, as well as a snack bar and dining facilities. Cricket Club residents are well served by public transit. Bus services on Avenue Road and Yonge Street connect to the Yonge-University-Spadina subway line. The Lawrence and the York Mills subway stations are within reasonable walking distance of the homes in this neighbourhood. Motorists can get downtown to Toronto's business and entertainment districts via Yonge Street or Avenue Road in approximately twenty-five minutes. For commuters the Yonge Street and the Avenue Road on-ramps to Highway 401 are conveniently located just beyond the north boundary of this neighbourhood.
Description provided by Torontoneighbourhoods.net
Cricket Club is located in the Toronto Real Estate Board District C04.
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Danforth

Danforth Village is well known for its shopping district along Danforth Avenue. The Danforth's many shops and restaurants reflect the multicultural flavour of the residents who live in this neighbourhood. The relative affordability of the houses in Danforth Village, together with the convenience of the Bloor-Danforth subway line make this neighbourhood an excellent choice for first time home buyers. This neighbourhood has become a recent hot spot for young professionals' many of whom are noted artists. It would not surprise if your neighbour was a member of the Toronto Symphony, Canadian Opera, or film and television performers; a far cry from the blue collar families that once proliferated in this neighbourhood. The "Danny" as this neighbourhood is affectionately known attracts visitors from across the city in the springtime to a number of popular street festivals; and in the Fall garden tours together with studio visits provide an up close opportunity to get to know your neighbours. This neighbourhood is proud of its active parent participation in the school system which has welcomed many new families in recent years. North of the Danforth the streets are lined with semi-detached houses that feature distinctive front porches. South of the Danforth the homes are more varied ranging in size and style from Victorian semis, to bungalows and newer townhouses. The typical Danforth Village home was built in the 1920s and 1930s. Danforth Avenue offers local residents a full range of shops and services. The Danforth is well known for it's authentic Greek restaurants and fresh fruit and vegetable markets. Danforth Avenue is also known for its many bargain and discount stores. Shoppers World, an outdoor mall at the corner of Victoria Park and the Danforth is one of Toronto's largest discount malls. Monarch Park, located south of the Danforth between Coxwell and Greenwood features a variety of recreational facilities including an artificial ice rink, a wading pool, and a swimming pool. The East Toronto Athletic Field located at Gerrard and Main Streets encompasses a number of sports fields. The Ted Reeve Indoor Hockey Arena is situated adjacent to the sports fields. The Earl Beattie Community Centre on Woodington Avenue just north of the Danforth has an indoor swimming pool, and a gymnasium. The Danforth/Coxwell Public Library offers programs for toddlers and preschoolers. Danforth Village is well served by public transit. The Bloor- Danforth subway has stations at Greenwood, Coxwell, Woodbine, Main, and Victoria Park. There is also a Go Train station at Danforth and Main. Regular bus or streetcar service runs on Greenwood, Coxwell, Gerrard, and Woodbine Avenue. Danforth Avenue provides motorists with easy access to the downtown while commuters are ten to fifteen minutes from the Don Valley Parkway and Lake Shore Boulevard.

Description provided by Torontoneighbourhoods.net
The Danforth is located in the Toronto Real Estate Board District E01, E02, and E03.
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Davisville Village

This centrally located neighbourhood has always been popular with singles, young couples and families. The Davisville neighbourhood is known for its excellent recreational facilities, outstanding shopping districts, and active nightlife, which includes bars, restaurants and movie theatres. The majority of Davisville houses were built in the 1920's and 1930's. The houses west of Mount Pleasant Road are mostly large two and three-storey English Cottage and Edwardian-style homes. There are also a number of duplexes and walk-up apartment buildings in this area.

The houses east of Mount Pleasant Road are made up primarily of smaller detached houses, semi-detached houses and bungalows. This part of the neighbourhood also contains a handful of historical homes from the late 1800's, and a growing number of new custom built homes. Davisville Village also contains a number of newer condominium apartment buildings located mostly on Merton and Balliol Streets and along Eglinton Avenue. A plethora of rental high-rise apartment buildings are situated on Davisville Avenue. Davisville Park is the social and recreational centre of this neighbourhood. During the day, it is a beehive of activity with preschoolers enjoying the Davisville Park playground and wading pool. Davisville Park's six tennis courts are used by the Davisville Tennis Club on evenings and weekends. This club has an active house league and tournament schedule. Adjacent to the tennis courts is the Davisville Park baseball diamond, which is extensively used by children and adult baseball leagues. Davisville also has an active nightlife with many pubs, restaurants, and movie theatres. Davisville Village's main shopping district is on Mount Pleasant Road. This shopping district is known as Mount Pleasant Village where you will find some of Toronto's best restaurants and cafes as well as specialty food shops. This stretch of stores is also highlighted by a large group of antique and collectable shops that attract people from all over the city. Home decorating stores, children's clothing and toy stores, a neighbourhood library and an old fashioned movie theatre all add to the ambience of this street. Davisville Village residents also enjoy shopping along Yonge Street, Eglinton Avenue and Bayview Avenue. These shopping areas contain a plethora of gift shops, clothing and accessory stores, bakeries, cafes, and coffee shops. Professional and medical offices proliferate in the small commercial buildings along these corridors. There is local bus service on Mount Pleasant Road, Yonge Street, Davisville Avenue and Eglinton Avenue. These bus routes connect passengers to the Yonge-University-Spadina subway line. The Davisville and the Eglinton subway stations at Yonge Street are within a reasonable walking distance of this neighbourhood. This area offers motorists quick access to downtown Toronto via either Mount Pleasant Road or Yonge Street. Toronto's highways and expressways are located within a twenty minute drive of Davisville Village.
Description provided by Torontoneighbourhoods.net
Davisville Village is located in Toronto Real Estate Board District C10.
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Deer Park

Deer Park is different from many upscale Toronto neighbourhoods in that its homes are not isolated on the periphery of the neighbourhood. The residential streets spill out onto either Yonge Street or St. Clair Avenue, right into the heart of one of Toronto's busiest shopping, entertainment, and business districts.

Deer Park's commercial centre provides a good balance for this neighbourhood which is surrounded by lush green parkland, majestic trees, and the Vale of Avoca Ravine. Deer Park has a wonderful mix of detached and semi-detached houses that encompass a variety of architectural styles. Most of the original Deer Park houses were built between 1875 and 1920. Deer Park also contains a fair number of newer townhouses that blend in well with the older homes in the neighbourhood. Deer Park has one of the largest selections of luxury condominium apartment buildings in Toronto. Most of these apartments have balconies with picturesque views of the park, the ravine or the city. The Yonge and St. Clair shopping district is known for its many fine restaurants. The high profile retailers in this area attract shoppers from all over the city. Most of the local staple and grocery stores are located inside the St. Clair Centre and The Towne Mall or at the Delisle Court. The Rosehill Reservoir located just steps from Yonge and St. Clair at 75 Rosehill Ave., is one of Toronto's prettiest greenspace. Together with David Balfour Park this is an oasis in the bustling midtown core. The Rosehill Reservoir which forms the upper tier of this park includes a very pretty four acre reflecting pool lined with cobblestones. There is also an adjacent waterfall with a small bridge and a maze of stairs on each side, as well as a separate water fountain feature with a dramatic overhead spray that rushes water into the oval pool below. There is also a pretty flower garden and wading pool tucked away at the far end of the park. Wrapped around Rosehill Reservoir is David Balfour Park that features a surfaced path that's ideal for walking, jogging and cycling. This well treed park has a large children's playground. Sign markers on the east side of the park indicate access points to the Vale of Avoca Ravine which includes a hiking trail that follows the path of an adjacent meandering creek. The urban forest and all the nature it nurtures is remarkably vibrant, and a pleasant surprise given the proximity to such a well established urban area. Oriole Park located at the northern tip of Deer Park has a playground, a wading pool, two tennis courts and access to the Belt Line', a seven kilometre path that follows the route of Toronto's old Belt Line Railway. Oriole Park is also home to the newly created Neshama Playground. The Neshama Playground features a water play area, sensory musical features, Braille panels, an enclosed climbing merry-go-round and bounce pad, accessible swings and play structures, and colourful, springy surfacing. The St. Clair subway station is within walking distance of every home in Deer Park. Motorists are approximately ten minutes from downtown, and twenty minutes from Toronto's Expressways and Highways.
Description provided by Torontoneighbourhoods.net
Deer Park is located in Toronto Real Estate Board District C02 and C09.
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Distillery District

Set amidst the backdrop of the largest and best preserved Victorian Industrial Architecture in North America The Distillery Historic District is one of Toronto's hottest new neighbourhoods. This unique pedestrian only neighbourhood charms you from the moment you step foot on one of the over 600,000 historic red brick pavers purchased from Cleveland to complete the Distillery's pedestrian walkways. No matter how many times you visit The Distillery it's hard not to be in awe of the beautifully restored iconic brick buildings that define this neighbourhood. The Distillery Historic District is a neighbourhood where you can live, work and play. Right from the start the identity of this neighbourhood has been focused on arts, culture, and entertainment. The many artisans, theatres, restaurants, galleries, cafes and boutique retailers that call this area home all share a passion for their neighbourhood. The Distillery Historic District is a neighbourhood that is clearly proud of its history and has drawn inspiration from its past to help make this one of Toronto's most vibrant places to live, work and play.

Don Mills

Don Mills is one of Toronto's best known and most popular neighbourhoods. Neighbourhood landmarks include the picturesque Donalda Golf and Country Club, and scenic Edwards Gardens. The commercial/industrial sector of Don Mills serves as the head office for IBM Canada Ltd., Global Television Station, the Toronto Real Estate Board and many other prominent companies.

Everything old is new once again. When the former Don Mills Shopping Centre opened in the 1960s it began as an outdoor shopping plaza and eventually as times and tastes changed it was retrofitted into an indoor shopping centre. Now the old shopping centre has now been transformed once again into the new Shops at Don Mills where shoppers can enjoy an outdoor retail experience. While outdoor shopping plazas may not be new to Toronto the Shops at Don Mills is like no other outdoor shopping experience in Toronto. The new urbanism look and feel of this shopping destination is anchored by the Town Square located in the middle of the development. The Town Square is flanked on one side by a magnificent water feature that twice every hour, erupts into a four minute choreographed show. At the other end of the Town Square is an eye popping clock tower that is actually a sculpture designed by famed Canadian artist and author Douglas Coupland. The symbols on this unique clock tower are models of houses that resemble those found in the Don Mills neighbourhood. In addition to great shops and restaurants a plethora of special community events and festivals are held at the Shops at Don Mills throughout the year. Shops at Don Mills located on the southwest corner of Don Mills Road and Lawrence Avenue East is a family friendly neighbourhood landmark and meeting place. This contemporary open-air shopping centre is designed with an urban village theme where shoppers can partake in exciting year round events. The venue for these events is the Town Square which features a dramatic clock tower, a robotic water feature and an oval ice rink. Gourmet food shops and restaurants are part of the mix. Many of Don Mills smaller local parks are connected by a paved walkway that runs behind Don Mills' houses. Another path inside Edwards Gardens is part of a nine kilometre paved trail that follows the valley of the West Don River all the way to Warden Woods Park in Scarborough. Bond Park, located off Duncairn Road, is Don Mills largest park. It includes extensive baseball facilities and organized leagues, and is also home to the North York Winter Tennis Club. Three Valleys Park, located next to Three Valleys School has a large children's playground and tennis courts. The Don Mills Civitan Arena located at 1030 Don Mills Road has a children's house league program and offers pleasure skating at designated times throughout the week. The Don Mills Public Library at 881 Lawrence Avenue East has regular programming for babies, toddlers, preschoolers, and school children. Don Mills is near to the Ontario Science Centre located at 770 Don Mills Road. Bus routes on York Mills Road, Lawrence Avenue East and Leslie Street connect passengers to stations on the Yonge-University-Spadina subway line. The Don Mills Road bus connects to the Pape station on the Bloor-Danforth subway line. Don Mills Road provides commuters with a quick and easy access route to downtown Toronto. North and south on-ramps to the Don Valley Parkway are located east of Don Mills Road, off Eglinton and Lawrence Avenues and off York Mills Road.
Description provided by Torontoneighbourhoods.net
Don Mills is located in Toronto Real Estate Board District C13.
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Don Valley Village

The neighbourhood, developed in the 1960s and 1970s, occupies the space that was originally a collection of farming hamlets in the early 19th century. In 1963, Consolidated Building Corporation developed a large part of Don Valley Village, advertising three-bedroom houses for ,550, and providing a "trade-in" on purchasers' current houses.[1] Two historical landmarks still exist from that period: the Zion Schoolhouse and the Alexander Muirhead Victorian farmhouse. The area also includes Fairview Mall, one of Toronto's largest shopping centres. Noteworthy facilities just outside this neighbourhood include North York General Hospital (on the south side of Sheppard Avenue), Seneca College's Newnham Campus (on the north side of Finch), and the Cummer Park Fitness Centre (on the west side of Leslie, just north of Finch), which is one of Toronto's largest municipally operated recreational facilities. The Zion Primitive Methodist Church is on the north side of Finch Avenue East, just outside the neighbourhood. Don Valley Village is home to many new Canadian immigrants, including those of Armenian, Chinese, West Indian, East Indian or Middle Eastern descent. The mix of housing here includes split level homes, semi-detached homes, and family size detached houses featuring Georgian, Tudor, and contemporary-style designs. There is also a large concentration of high-rise apartment and condominium buildings. The area is extremely well connected to the rest of the city. Close by is the crossroads of two major freeways (Highway 401 and Highway 404/Don Valley Parkway). As well, two subways stations, Don Mills Station – the current eastern terminus of the Sheppard subway line, which connects with nine Toronto Transit Commission routes, one York Region Transit route, and the Viva Green line – and Leslie Station are both located within the neighbourhood.

Dovercourt - Wallace Emerson Junction

The west-end Toronto neighbourhood of Dovercourt-Wallace Emerson Junction is close to the centre of downtown Toronto and includes a number of smaller communities: Bloordale Village, Bloorcourt, Dovercourt, Wallace Emerson and the Junction Triangle. Found just east of Dundas Street West along Bloor Street to Christie Street and jogging north of Dupont. The treed residential streets have a close family and community feel with a blend of the original multi-cultural families and the new hipsters that are moving in. The housing stock is a combination of older detached and semis that are taking on a new look and feel with contemporary renovations and sleek remodelling as new owners move into the hood. Newer townhouses and converted lofts are an option for buyers that are adverse to updating or renovating. The Dovercourt-Wallace Emerson Junction area is unique in having a number of industrial and heritage buildings converted to condo Lofts.

Downtown Core

If you want to live in a fast paced, frenetic and vibrant Toronto neighbourhood that never sleeps, the Downtown Core is your best choice. During the day the Downtown Core is all business and suits with many corporate offices headquartered here. At night it is buzzing with activity as swarms of people descend on the nightly sports and entertainment events at the Air Canada Centre and Rogers Centre. The Financial and Entertainment districts as well as the Toronto waterfront are all located on the doorstep of this neighbourhood. The downtown core comprises of only 3% of Toronto's land area, but contributes a substantial amount of the city's vitality and economic strength. Residents of the core are consistently treated to world class food, shopping and entertainment. Located entirely within the former municipality of Old Toronto, you will find plenty of subdistricts within that have their own unique charm and character. The area offers several world class post-secondary institutions and seemingly limitless opportunities for employment.

Downtown Toronto

The downtown core comprises of only 3% of Toronto's land area, but contributes a substantial amount of the city's vitality and economic strength. Residents of the core are consistently treated to world class food, shopping and entertainment. Located entirely within the former municipality of Old Toronto, you will find plenty of subdistricts within that have their own unique charm and character. The area offers several world class post-secondary institutions and seemingly limitless opportunities for employment.

Dufferin Grove

Dufferin Grove is a popular family oriented neighbourhood located in downtown Toronto. This neighbourhood has excellent amenities including a popular community park, a shopping centre, excellent schools and and convenient access to public transit. Dufferin Grove Park has received lots of media attention in the past for its pivotal role in revitalizing the Dufferin Grove neighbourhood and creating a strong sense of community among residents of this neighbourhood. This park is basically a community centre without any walls! It is so popular that local residents affectionately refer to it as their Big Backyard.

Dundas West

East End

The East end is a varied, vibrant part of town. Largely residential, the East end is defined by its major thoroughfares (Queen St. E, Dundas St., E, Gerrard St. E, the Danforth), where the majority of the attractions are located, and the residential streets where most of the neighbourhood's residents live. These residential streets are quiet and shaded by old oaks and maples, and contain old homes and townhouses of an astonishing variety of architectural styles. Embedded within these residential streets are a number of large parks, including Riverdale Park, with its breathtaking view of the skyline, Withrow Park, Greenwood Park, Jimmie Simpson Park, Kew Gardens, Beaches Park, and countless smaller neighbourhood parks. Two of the highlights of the East End are the Danforth, which is the heart of Greektown, the largest Greek neighbourhood in North America, and Queen East with its diverse offerings. Greektown stretches from Broadview Ave. to Donlands Ave., and is full of Greek restaurants and businesses, as well as bars, cafes, and retail shops. Because the subway runs along Danforth, there is a substantial population in the area as well as a steady stream of non-residents who visit the neighbourhood's shops and restaurants, making it a busy, bustling, vibrant place, especially on weekends and during the summer, when the Tastes of the Danforth festival brings over one million participants to the neighbourhood over two days in August. The other major highlight of the East End is Queen East, which stretches for many blocks from Broadview all the way to Neville Park. Along the western portion of Queen East, an enormous revitalization effort has been under way, transforming an area that was once known for little more than its booze-cans, cheap diners, and tacky furniture shops into one of the hippest up-and-coming areas in the city. A plethora of new restaurants, eateries, bars, bakeries and shops have made this a real gastronomic destination, and since it has been the centre of Toronto's film industry for years, the Queen East has finally reached a tipping point, drawing in hip, young, upwardly mobile people from all over the GTA, transforming the area from a low-rent backwater into a trendsetter reminiscent of Queen West in the early 90's.

East York

For many years East York has held the distinction of having the highest percentage of senior citizens in Metropolitan Toronto. These demographics are changing however as many young families are now moving into this neighbourhood. Home buyers are finding East York attractive because the houses are relatively affordable and the location offers quick and easy access to downtown Toronto.

The majority of East York's housing stock was built in stages beginning in the 1890's and continuing right up until the early 1960's. With the houses having been built over such a wide period of time, a myriad of different housing styles is evident from one street to the next. East York is comprised of two storey or one-and-a half-storey detached and semi-detached houses, as well as an abundance of bungalows, and some newer custom designed homes. There are also a large number of high rise rental apartment buildings concentrated along Cosburn Avenue between Broadview and Donlands Avenues. The majority of shopping in East York is located on the main north-south arterial roadways including Pape, Donlands, Greenwood, Coxwell, and Woodbine Avenues. At the south end of East York, Danforth Avenue provides shoppers with a colourful array of fruit markets, bakeries, coffee shops, clothing and accessory stores and Toronto's best selection of Greek restaurants. East York is brimming with both indoor and outdoor recreational facilities. The East York Tennis Club on Roosevelt Road has five tennis courts, Dentonia Park Tennis Club off Dawes road has four courts and East York Collegiate has four courts. The Dentonia Park Golf Course located off Victoria Park Avenue is a challenging eighteen hole public course with a moderately difficult rating. Stan Wadlow Park off Cosburn Avenue features five baseball diamonds and a batting cage. The excellent baseball facilities at this park helped produce the likes of Rich and Rob Butler, two native East Yorkers that went on to play major league baseball. Stan Wadlow Park also contains, two outdoor swimming pools, a handball wall, and picnic areas. It also serves as an access point to Taylor Creek Park, part of a nine kilometre paved trail that is ideal for nature walks, jogging, and cycling. Adjacent to Stan Wadlow Park is the East York Memorial Arena which provides recreational and league hockey programs as well as public skating. Across the street from Stan Wadlow Park is the East York Curling Club. The Dieppe Park Sports Complex at Greenwood and Cosburn has an outdoor ice rink, sports fields and a baseball diamond. The newly refurbished East York Community Centre at 1081 Pape Avenue has an indoor pool, a multi-purpose gymnasium, a weight room, and a small public library. The S. Walter Stewart Library at 170 Memorial Park Avenue features a large auditorium for storytelling and puppet shows. The Dawes Road Library at 416 Dawes Road also has children's programming. The Secord Community Centre at 91 Barrington Avenue and the Terry Fox Community Centre at 2 Gledhill Avenue have gymnasiums as well as community meeting rooms. Enjoy winter fun at Dieppe Park (located at 455 Cosburn Ave.) with a skate on the new rink and the skating path. East York residents are conveniently located within a ten to fifteen minute drive of Toronto's financial and entertainment districts. Bus service on O'Connor Drive and Pape, Donlands, Coxwell, Mortimer, Cosburn and Lumsden Avenues, provide passengers with a quick connection to subway stations on the Bloor-Danforth line.
Description provided by Torontoneighbourhoods.net
East York is located in Toronto Real Estate Board District E03.
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Englemount - Lawrence

The Englemount–Lawrence neighbourhood in central Toronto is defined by Bathurst Street on the east, Hillhurst Boulevard on the south, Allen Road on the west and Highway 401 on the north. Englemount and Lawrence homes were part of the City of North York until the 1998 amalgamation of five cities and one borough into the new City of Toronto. Englemount is just south of Lawrence Avenue. Most of the area's housing developments were constructed in the 1950s. In recent years, the face of Engelmount-Lawrence has been changing gradually with some of the old structures replaced with luxurious and stately renovations. The housing inventory consists of detached and semi-detached homes of mostly modernist, stone and brick construction. Some low to mid-rise apartments still exist along with aging social housing that are targeted for redevelopment. Students who reside in the area may attend the public schools of Glen Park, Flemington Public and Baycrest along with John Polanyi Collegiate Institute. The area is also served by a number of private schools including nine Jewish day schools and a Catholic school for girls. The area’s proximity to the retail district on Bathurst Street and Lawrence Plaza on the west gives residents easy access to many shops. Restaurants and stores frequented by locals include the Dairy Treats European Café and Bakery and Daiter’s Fresh Market, a family-managed grocery. Green space and public parks include Baycrest Park on the northwest, Viewmount Park on the southwest sector and Rajah Park located on the northeast. The Engelmount-Lawrence community is slated for major facelift as the Lawrence-Allen revitalization project proceeds with the upgrading of social housing in the Lawrence Heights neighbourhood. New retail stores and improved public spaces including bicycle trails and walking paths are expected. This area will continue to draw interest because of its location within the Toronto metropolitan area as well as excellent access to public transportation and Ontario’s highway network.

Etobicoke

Etobicoke's population is very diverse, with people from all over the world including South Asians, East Asians, Middle Easterners, West Indians, Africans and Europeans. Etobicoke is primarily suburban in development, with a lower population density than central Toronto, larger main streets, shopping malls, and cul-de-sac housing developments. Etobicoke has several expressways within its borders, including the Queen Elizabeth Way, Gardiner Expressway, Ontario Highway 427, Ontario Highway 401 and Ontario Highway 409. Etobicoke is connected to the rest of Toronto by four stations of the Bloor-Danforth subway, which has its western terminus at Kipling Avenue, and by four GO stations. Etobicoke has one post-secondary institution: Humber College, which has two campuses. Etobicoke has the lowest population density of the former cities and boroughs that currently make up the city of Toronto. Residential development consists primarily of single-family dwellings, although several large multi-storey high-rise condominium developments have been built in south Etobicoke near the Humber River over the past few years. The central areas of Etobicoke are generally middle class. The central and northern areas of Etobicoke contain numerous high-density apartment complexes set in the middle of sizable, open fields and parks. The central/southern areas of Etobicoke, such as Markland Wood, The Kingsway, New Toronto, Mimico and Long Branch, consist of large green spaces, numerous parks, and main street shopping areas. Etobicoke has numerous public parks, notable among them is James Gardens on the banks of the Humber River. The park includes seasonal flowers, walkways, a rock garden, streams, and waterfalls. It is a very popular site for taking wedding photographs. Also located in Etobicoke, among others, are Colonel Samuel Smith Park, situated on old asylum grounds shared with nearby Humber College and the Humber Bay Park. Etobicoke has numerous golf courses including St. George's Golf and Country Club, which in 2007 was ranked as one of the three best courses in Canada

Flemingdon Park

Flemingdon Park is a multicultural neighbourhood that has traditionally served as the first home for many new Canadians seeking affordable housing in the City of Toronto. A recent Flemingdon Park Public Library study places the total population of this neighbourhood at approximately twenty thousand people with over eighty different languages being spoken within the community. Flemingdon Park residents have their own community information centre and health centre, a non-profit legal services clinic and a number of support programs for children, women, and families.

Forest Hill

The Forest Hill neighbourhood is one of Toronto's most prestigious districts. The mansions in Lower Forest Hill are rivalled only by those found in Rosedale. Forest Hill's schools are among the best in the country. They include two of Canada's most revered private schools: Upper Canada College for boys, and Bishop Strachan School for girls. Forest Hill is one of Toronto's prettier districts. Its topography is very diverse with gently sloping hills, winding roads, and numerous little parkettes all adding charm to the neighbourhood.

Forest Hill's old building codes and bylaws, dating back to the 1920's and 1930's, required that all Forest Hill houses be designed by an architect, and that a tree be planted at the front of each property. This foresight by Village planners has left a legacy of beauty in the brick and stone mansions, and majestic trees that grace the streets of Lower Forest Hill. The Upper Village houses were built mostly in the 1940's and 1950's. These houses are more modest than their Lower Village counterparts, however the lot sizes are comparable between the two districts. Forest Hill also contains a fair number of luxury condominium apartment buildings, located west of Spadina on Lonsdale Road and Heath Street West. The Forest Hill Village shopping district is centred around the intersection of Spadina Road and Lonsdale Road. The ambience of this private enclave of stores is that of a small town rather than a big city. The Village's boutiques and shops cater to the specific needs of Forest Hill's affluent residents. The Eglinton West Village shopping district has a large variety of stores to suit every taste and budget. This street also contains many fine restaurants and food stores. The Belt Line fitness and nature trail follows the route of the former Belt Line railway, which was Toronto's first commuter train. This fourteen and one-half kilometre track passes through Forest Hill on its way down to Rosedale. The Belt Line Path is enjoyed by both nature and fitness enthusiasts. Forest Hill's Public Library has a myriad of programs for adults, children, and preschoolers. Forest Hill is conveniently located within walking distance of numerous bus routes that connect passengers to Toronto's rapid transit subway lines. For motorists commuting in and out of the city, the Allen Expressway is easily accessed from Eglinton Avenue West.
Description provided by Torontoneighbourhoods.net
Forest Hill is located in Toronto Real Estate Board District C03.
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Glen Park

Governor's Bridge

Governor's Bridge is an exclusive enclave of approximately one hundred and fifteen homes nestled in a wooded ravine valley which hides the fact that this neighbourhood is just five minutes from downtown Toronto.

There is very little turnover of homes in this highly sought after neighbourhood and its easy to see why once you experience the peace and tranquility that this idyllic setting offers to its residents. The Governor's Bridge neighbourhood features an eclectic mix of houses that come in all sizes, shapes, and architectural styles. These houses were built in the 1920's, 1930's, and 1940's. Many of the original bungalows are being torn down and replaced by new custom designed houses that fit well on the generous size lots that are characteristic of this neighbourhood. For those seeking the ultimate in privacy the houses on Douglas Crescent sit perched atop the wooded slopes of the Moore Park Ravine. Blue Jays, raccoons and even the occasional fox are some of the wildlife to be spotted from the backyards of these homes. The Governor's Manor, located at 67-93 Douglas Crescent has recently been converted into upscale condominium townhomes. This English Tudor style apartment, built in the 1920's, is a stately looking building that adds to the grandeur of this exclusive neighbourhood. The closest shopping district to the Governor's Bridge neighbourhood is a cluster of stores and a shopping plaza located at the intersection of Bayview and Moore Avenues. This group of stores includes a national grocery store, a pharmacy, a dry cleaner, and a bank. Residents of this neighbourhood also shop along quaint Summerhill Avenue in the Rosedale neighbourhood. Further north on Bayview Avenue is the Leaside shopping district. This upscale shopping area includes fashion boutiques, antique stores, gift shops, professional services, gourmet coffee shops, specialty food stores, and a number of restaurants and cafes. Nesbitt Park is the quintessential neighbourhood park. This park is especially popular with families who have young children as it features an excellent children's playground. The Moore Park Ravine can be accessed from Chorley Park which is situated within a short walk of this neighbourhood. The Moore Park Ravine walking trail is popular with bird watchers and nature enthusiasts. This trail follows the route of the old Belt Line Railway Company, a commuter railway train which ran through the Moore Park Ravine and through the City of Toronto from 1892 until 1894. The Belt Line tracks were removed during the First World War and used in the war effort in France. Governor's Bridge residents can catch the Rosedale bus on Summerhill Avenue. This bus route connects to the Rosedale station on the Yonge-University-Spadina subway line. Motorists can quickly access the Bayview extension at the north-east section of this neighbourhood. The Bayview extension provides motorists with a quick passage into the downtown core.
Description provided by Torontoneighbourhoods.net
Governor’s Bridge is located in the Toronto Real Estate Board District C11.
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Greenwood Coxwell

Greenwood Coxwell

Harbourfront

The Harbourfront neighbourhood incorporates a unique blend of residential, cultural, recreational, and commercial uses, all within the same community. Harbourfront also serves as Toronto's playground by the lake. It is enjoyed by all Toronto residents, as well as being a popular destination point for tourists. In the summertime and with the arrival of nice weather many Torontonians and visitors to this city will flock to Toronto’s Harbourfront neighbourhood to partake in a cultural event, enjoy a leisurely stroll, exercise along the boardwalk, or enjoy fine dining on the waterfront. If you want to try your hand at boating Harbourfront has a powerboat and sailing school. There are also two marinas operated by Harbourfront where visitors can dock overnight and enjoy the festivities. Harbourfront also runs a popular children’s summer camp.

Henry Farm

Henry Farm is a small, family oriented neighbourhood with a strong sense of community spirit. Henry Farm has always had an active community association which oversees Neighbourhood Watch and Block Parent Programs, and organizes recreational activities including fitness classes at the Shaugnessey Public School and an annual "neighbours night out" barbecue and picnic also held at the school. The Henry Farm Residents Association publishes a regular newsletter called the "Henry Farmer", which keeps residents up to date with all of the goings on in the neighbourhood.

High Park

The High Park neighbourhood is home to a wide range of people. Its highly regarded schools including Humberside Collegiate attract many families with school age children to this neighbourhood.

High Park contains a diverse housing mix. Families gravitate to the single family homes in the neighbourhood. There are also a large number of rental opportunities in High Park which appeal to singles and couples. The topography of the High Park neighbourhood features gently rolling hills, winding streets, and towering Oak trees that enchant and delight all those who live here. High Park's winding tree-lined streets are lined with impressive Victorian, Edwardian, and Tudor-style homes. These captivating houses were built largely during the late 1800's and early 1900's. Several of these houses have been divided into multiple-family dwellings. High Park's distinctive brick homes feature a variety of architectural details that vary from house to house. These features include leaded and stained glass windows, lush wood trims, french doors, hardwood floors and fireplaces. The High Park neighbourhood also features a selection of condominium apartment buildings along Quebec Avenue, north of Bloor Street. These apartments are in the entry level price range. They include balconies, some of which feature south views that overlook High Park and Lake Ontario. High Park is conveniently located within walking distance of 'Bloor West Village', one of Toronto's most popular shopping districts. The 'Village' is known across the City for its European bakeries, delicatessens, specialty food shops, cafes and restaurants. High Park's other major shopping area is the 'Junction Gardens', along Dundas Street West. This recently revitalized retail district has gone back to its roots as a railway centre by incorporating a railway lantern into the heritage street signs along Dundas Street. High Park encompasses 399 acres of public parkland. This city park includes a fishing pond, an outdoor theatre, an animal paddocks, picnic grounds, playgrounds, a restaurant, an historic museum, flower gardens, an adventure playground and a trackless train. High Park's sports facilities include tennis, baseball, soccer, lawn bowling, swimming, and skating, as well as walking, jogging and cycling paths found throughout the park. You can read all about the rich history of High Park at the Runnymede Public Library on Bloor Street or the High Park Public Library on Roncesvalles. Both these libraries offer a myriad of programs for neighbourhood residents. Launched in 1998, the Jamie Bell Adventure Playground (located at 1873 Bloor St. W. in High Park) is a family meeting place that was inspired and built by the imagination and creativity of the local community and its children. A fire at the playground on March 17 destroyed a large portion of the popular structure. This beloved neighbourhood landmark was rebuilt in 2012. The Bloor-Danforth subway line has three stations serving the High Park neighbourhood including the Runnymede, High Park, and Keele stations. Motorists are approximately five minutes from the Queensway, which connects commuters to Lake Shore Boulevard and the Gardiner Expressway.
Description provided by Torontoneighbourhoods.net
High Park North is located in the Toronto Real Estate Board District W02.
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Hoggs Hollow

Heading north on Yonge Street, past the prominent Lobalaw Superstore with the cedar shingled roof, motorists begin a decent down a steep valley. As you make your way down into the valley, you will see blue and white Hogg's Hollow street signs that beckon you to discover where they might lead. Follow these signs and you will be in the storybook neighbourhood of Hogg's Hollow.

Hogg's Hollow is an enchanted place set in the rustic beauty of the Don River valley. Here you will find winding crescents and private cul-de-sacs lined with a colour guard of majestic Maple, Birch, Pine, Spruce and Willow Trees. There is even a stone bridge in the middle of this neighbourhood under which the Don River gently flows on its winding course towards Lake Ontario. Hogg's Hollow's idyllic charm comes with a huge price tag as this is one of Toronto's most expensive neighbourhoods. Hogg's Hollow houses are set in a lush landscape with a hill and dale topography that is left unfettered and in its original state without the intrusion of sidewalks. Hogg's Hollow houses were built over a long period of time between the 1920's and 1960's, which accounts for the curious mixture of English Cottage, Tudor, Colonial, Georgian and Modernist architecture found here. Freshly painted window shutters adorn many of these houses and picket fences are also popular. Hogg's Hollow also contains luxury condominium townhouses and apartment buildings on the brow of the Yonge Street hill, overlooking the valley. Hogg's Hollow residents can walk to the York Mills Centre located at the north-east corner of Yonge Street and York Mills Road. This centre includes retail shops and services, medical offices and a food court. The Yonge Street shopping district to the south of Hogg's Hollow is anchored by a Loblaws Super Store, which features a garden centre and a take out restaurant. Continuing south on Yonge Street you will find clothing stores, professional and medical offices, restaurants and basic household services. The oldest and most prestigious municipal course, Don Valley has a classic Howard Watson design, a traditional variety of holes, and a reputation for its exciting, natural setting. It's a challenge to even the most skilled of golfers. Hogg's Hollow residents can walk to the York Mills subway station entrances at either Old York Mills Road or inside the York Mills Centre. The York Mills station is also a Go Transit station that includes an express bus service to the Pearson International Airport. Yonge Street provides motorists with a direct route downtown in only twenty minutes. For commuters the Yonge Street on-ramp to Highway 401 is just a few minutes north of Hogg's Hollow.
Description provided by Torontoneighbourhoods.net
Hoggs Hollow is located in the Toronto Real Estate Board District C12.
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Humewood-Cedarvale

Humewood is an established family oriented neighbourhood conveniently located approximately fifteen minutes from Toronto's financial and entertainment districts. There are many amenities such as parks and schools located in the interior of this neighbourhood while shopping and public transit are easily accessed from St. Clair Avenue.

Humewood's intimate streetscape is enhanced by the many tree-lined streets and culs de sac found throughout the neighbourhood. Many of these streets are one-way, with very few through streets, which helps to minimize the traffic flow in this quiet tucked-away neighbourhood. The defining feature of this neighbourhood is the Cedarvale Ravine, which cuts a wide diagonal swath through the middle of Cedarvale. This ravine provides numerous recreational opportunities. Cedarvale has an established Jewish community that has grown up around the Holy Blossom Temple and Beth Tzedec Synagogue, which are both situated on Bathurst Street. Humewood/Cedarvale is an established family oriented neighbourhood conveniently located approximately fifteen minutes from Toronto's financial and entertainment districts. There are many amenities such as parks and schools located in the interior of this neighbourhood while shopping and public transit are easily accessed from St. Clair Avenue. Eglinton Avenue West is one of Toronto's most glamorous and ritzy shopping districts. Included in the mix are high end fashion stores, gift and home improvement stores, specialty food shops, professional services and an excellent variety of restaurants. The shopping district further west along Eglinton Avenue and on Vaughan Road between Oakwood Avenue and Dufferin Street features the largest concentration of Caribbean shops, restaurants, and services in Toronto. A variety of recreational programs for pre-schoolers, children, youths, adults and seniors are offered at the Humewood Community School at 15 Cherrywood Avenue. Some of these programs include Ballet Bunnies (pre-schoolers), co-ed fitness (adults), and a Humewood Senior Citizens Club. This school also has a sports field, baseball diamonds and a children's playground. Vaughan Road Collegiate Institute at 529 Vaughan Road has an indoor pool that is used for children's and adult's Aquatics. Humewood Park located between Humewood Drive and Pinewood Avenue, is one of Toronto's prettier strolling gardens. It features gently sloping lawns, a forest of maple trees, park benches and a paved walkway that winds its way through this quaint park. Graham Park, on Atlas Avenue just north of St. Clair is a small park with a children's playground and a basketball court. The St. Clair West streetcar connects passengers to the St. Clair station on the Yonge-University-Spadina subway line while the Vaughan Road bus connects passengers to the St. Clair West station also on the Yonge-University-Spadina-Subway line. The Bathurst Street bus connects passengers to the Bathurst station on the Bloor-Danforth subway line.
Description provided by Torontoneighbourhoods.net
Humewood-Cedarvale is located in the Toronto Real Estate Board District C03.
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Islington Village

Known as "Toronto's Village of Murals" Islington Village is located in the heart of Etobicoke. This residential neighbourhood boasts 25 mural "masterpieces", enhancing the walls of over 15,000 square feet that span five blocks of the historic shopping distrinct on Dundas West. Painted by artist extraodinaire, John Kuna, the murals depict a cohesive history of the neighbourhood. A labour of love this project started over nine years ago and is still expanding. Boutique style shopping, quaint dining spots, local services, an abundance of greenspace and parkland, convenient access to TTC and Go Transit stations make Islington. Village is a great Downtown lifestyle alternative.

The original older traditional homes were built on generous lots and now are flanked by newer builds and developments. This neighbourhood is a great downtown lifestyle alternative, close to highways, and downtown Toronto, convenient access to TTC and Go Transit stations. The Mimico Creek and the Islington Golf Club wind their way through the centre of this picturesque neighbourhood. Islington's housing stock dates from the 1930's, 40's, and 50's. The older houses in this neighbourhood represent some of the best examples of Georgian, Colonial, English Cottage and Tudor style houses in the city. There is also a nice mix of Cape Cod style houses, ranch style bungalows and split-level homes. Many of these houses are situated on premium size lots that either front or back onto the Islington Golf Course. Islington also has a growing number of custom built new homes. Most of these houses are well designed and blend in well with the older houses in the neighbourhood. The Village of Islington on Dundas Street West between Montgomery Road and Kipling Avenue has an upscale tone with a small town feel. Stores here include a gourmet food shop, a deli, two drug stores, a hardware store, several flower shops, coffee houses and over 30 pubs, restaurants and cafes. The area known for its art and history is home to Arts Etobicoke, Creative Village, The Music Studio and Montgomery’s Inn. Further west along Dundas Street in the Dunbloor area are a cluster of small retail plazas, family style restaurants, professional and medical offices, new condos and specialty stores including a lingerie store and many salons. Visitors are always welcome in the Village of Islington to enjoy a leisurely stroll along Dundas Street West where you will spot colourful murals painted on the sides of local buildings. The Village of Islington has earned the well-deserved reputation of having the best quality murals in the city. Some of the mural themes include: tributes to Islington’s past volunteer fire brigade and acknowledgement of local farmers and prominent residents. The murals also look at the area’s role in historical events including Hurricane Hazel and the War of 1812. And one of the area’s most beloved murals entitled “Briarly – Gone but not forgotten” showcases an original home in the village, that unfortunately is no longer standing. The historic Montgomery's Inn located at 4709 Dundas Street West, is now a museum. This Georgian Loyalist Inn with its handsome riverstone exterior is one of the most beautiful and alluring buildings in Toronto. Montgomery's Inn hosts a number of year round festivals, a lecture series, and an afternoon tea in its cosy and comfortable tea room. The Islington Golf Club features a Par 72, 6400 yard course that was designed by renowned golf course architect Stanley Thompson. This private club has a friendly atmosphere and is geared towards families. If tennis is your game you will want to head to Rosethorn Park located just north of the Islington Golf Club. This park has three tennis courts and a children's playground. The Islington Baseball League has been in operation since 1952. This club operates out of Rosethorn Park. Programs include Co-ed T-Ball, Boys and Girls Rookie Ball, Clinics and Rep teams. Bus service on Islington and Kipling Avenues connect passengers to stations on the Bloor-Danforth subway line. The Kipling station also provides service to the Go Transit Line. Motorists are approximately twenty minutes from downtown Toronto via Bloor Street. Commuters are within a ten minute drive of the Islington and Kipling Avenue on-ramps to Highway 401 which connects to all of Toronto's major highways.
Description provided by Torontoneighbourhoods.net
Islington Village is located in the Toronto Real Estate Board District W08.
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Kensington - Chinatown

The Chinatown and Kensington Market neighbourhood in downtown Toronto is one of the city’s most distinctive, colourful, historic and creative areas. Hugely popular for the food and clothing stores, the restaurants and the artistic atmosphere, the neighbourhood is a fascinating mix of ethnic cultures, students, underground communities and businesses, political activism, professionals, old and new housing. While Chinatown — bordered roughly by College Street to the north, University Avenue to the east, Dundas Street West to the south and Spadina Avenue to the west — and Kensington Market — bordered by College Street to the north, Spadina to the east, Dundas to the south and Bathurst Street to the west — are distinct neighbourhoods, they blend smoothly into each other. Walking west from Chinatown, one finds oneself entering Kensington Market almost without noticing the gradual change until one realizes that the dumplings have changed to empanadas. The two tend to be thought of as one in part because they share a common heritage. In the first half of the 20th century, both Kensington and Chinatown were part of the large Jewish community that populated downtown Toronto. Following World War II, as the Jewish community moved further north and the Chinese found themselves moved out of the original Chinese neighbourhood on Dundas, the nature of the area changed. In the late 90s, a wave of Latin American immigrants found Kensington Market a welcoming home, making the area the puzzling but neighbourly and festive mixture found today. While the area has traditionally had a high proportion of immigrants — especially Chinese, Vietnamese, Portuguese and Latin American — it has always had a mixed population. A lot of students have made the area their home — from the University of Toronto on the neighbourhood’s northern edge and the Ontario College of Art and Design on the southern edge — but there’s also a lot of artists, fashion designers, small tech companies, underground music and dance clubs and a growing number of professionals attracted by the condos and lofts being renovated out of old warehouses and factories. The area — especially between University and Spadina — also has a number of quiet, tree-lined side-streets with older homes that have created a family atmosphere in the heart of downtown.

King West

King West Village is one of Toronto's fastest growing neighbourhoods. It has been compared to the Soho neighbourhood in New York. King West Village is especially popular with young urban professionals, both singles and couples, who desire an urban lifestyle close to their downtown offices and within walking distance of Toronto's entertainment district. In additional to residential options King West Village also includes: commercial office space, and one of the most active nightclub and bar scenes in Toronto. The Thompson Hotel located at 550 Wellington Street West has become a popular neighbourhood landmark. King West Village now has the added cache of being the host neighbourhood for the Toronto International Film Festival which takes place annually in September. This festival attracts mega-stars to premiere screenings and creates a buzz throughout the whole neighbourhood and the entire city. The headquarters for the festival is the TIFF Bell Lightbox theatre on King West, which is surrounded by glitzy new condominium buildings that reflect the urbanesque lifestyle enjoyed by residents of this neighbourhood.

Kingsview Village

Kingsview Village is a neighbourhood in the city of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. It is located in the north end of the former city of Etobicoke, and is bounded on the north by Highway 401, on the east by the Humber River and St. Phillips Road, on the south by Dixon Road. It is relatively close to Toronto Pearson International Airport in Mississauga, and TTC bus routes connect it to the rest of the city. In some cases, single family homes built in the 1960s are being demolished, their generous sized lots subdivided to allow up to three homes on a parcel of land where one initially stood. Smaller homes may be razed and have a much larger home built on the site. A trend called "monster homes" Kingsview is a recent name for the residential development north of Dixon Road, on the site of land owned by Ernest Byworth. The name 'Kingsview' is a reference to the neighbourhood's position on high ground.

Lawrence Park

Lawrence Park is one of Toronto's most exclusive residential neighbourhoods. It is located in a very peaceful and tranquil setting that includes gently rolling hills, winding roads and a lush topography. Lawrence Park's shops, schools, and recreational facilities are located on its periphery, which keeps traffic on the residential streets to a minimum.

Lawrence Park's whimsical houses include a variety of architectural styles including English Cottage, Tudor Revival and Georgian and Colonial style designs. The houses were built between 1910 and the late 1940's. Lawrence Park is a good place to find a house that blends the old with the new. Renovations in this neighbourhood have been sensitive to preserve the old world charm of these houses including leaded glass windows, wood trims around the door and window frames, decorative fireplace mantels and rich hardwood floors. Most of this neighbourhood's recreational facilities centre around Lawrence Park, east of Yonge Street, and south of Lawrence. This park has three clay surface tennis courts, a lawn bowling club, and the Alexander Muir Memorial Gardens, an award winning multi level strolling garden. This park also provides access to the Lawrence Park Ravine footpath, that is popular with fitness and nature enthusiasts. The George Locke Public Library at the north west corner of Lawrence Park offers a variety of programs for adults, children, and preschoolers. Most Lawrence Park residents are within walking distance of bus routes that run along Yonge Street, Mount Pleasant Road, Bayview Avenue, and Lawrence Avenue. The Lawrence subway station, located at the intersection of Yonge and Lawrence, is part of the Yonge-University-Spadina subway line. The Yonge Street on-ramp to Highway 401 is a five to ten minute drive from Lawrence Park.
Description provided by Torontoneighbourhoods.net
Lawrence Park is located in Toronto Real Estate District C04, C10 and C12.
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Lawrence Park North

Lawrence Park South

Leaside

Leaside is one of the most popular neighbourhoods in Toronto. In light of its high profile, it is not surprising that Leaside is also one of the more expensive real estate districts in Toronto. Leaside is in especially high demand with upper middle income families who value this neighbourhood as an ideal place to raise children. Leaside has abundant greenspace and parkland, a fine selection of schools, one of Toronto's best shopping districts on Bayview Avenue, and excellent access to public transit.

The typical Leaside house is situated on a generous size lot with a private drive and a garage. Most of the houses contain beautiful wood trim, hardwood floors and a working fireplace. Leaside's Tudor-style houses were built largely in the 1930's and 1940's. There is a good mix of two-storey detached homes, bungalows and semi-detached houses. A growing number of Leaside bungalows have had second storey additions, while others have been replaced by new custom designed homes. During the 1990's a handful of exclusive condominium and townhouse projects have been built on the periphery of the neighbourhood. Leaside also contains some of Toronto's nicest rental apartment buildings, located on the east side of Bayview Avenue and on Leacrest Road overlooking the Don Valley Ravine. Bayview Avenue features a wonderful collection of shops and restaurants. Many of these stores are geared towards children reflecting the demographics of this neighbourhood. Bayview Avenue is also known for its antique shops, specialty stores, and neighbourhood pubs, that attract a clientele from all over the city. Leaside residents also shop at the local stores along Eglinton Avenue. This shopping district is anchored by the Sunnybrook Plaza located at the north-east corner of Bayview and Eglinton. There are also some small shops and services located in the interior of the Leaside neighbourhood on both McRae Drive and Millwood Road. Leaside's newest shopping destination is the Leaside Centre, a collection of large national retailers located at the south-east corner of Laird Drive and Eglinton Avenue. Adjacent to the Leaside Centre is the Leaside Business Park which combines light industrial businesses mixed in with specialty retail stores. Few Toronto neighbourhoods can match Leaside when it comes to recreation. The Leaside Memorial Community Gardens at Millwood Road and Laird Drive is a multi-recreational complex that includes an indoor ice arena, an indoor swimming pool, a curling rink and an auditorium. Leaside residents can enjoy nature and fitness activities in Serena Gundy Park and Sunnybrook Park. In addition to offering ideal picnic spots Sunnybrook Park features top notch sports fields, an exercise trail, horseback riding stables and a licensed snack bar operated by the Parks and Property Department. Trace Manes Park, located in south Leaside off McRae Drive is the home of the Leaside Tennis Club which has six tennis courts. Trace Manes Park also has a tots playground, a baseball diamond and an outdoor natural ice rink which is in use from late December until the end of February. The Leaside Public Library is situated adjacent to this park off McRae Drive. Howard Talbot Park, situated in a picturesque valley at the south-east corner of Bayview and Eglinton Avenues features two baseball diamonds that are popular with local baseball leagues. Bus service winds its way through the interior of the Leaside neighbourhood, south of Eglinton Avenue and connects to the St. Clair subway station on the Yonge-University-Spadina subway line. Bus routes on Bayview and Eglinton Avenues connect to the Davisville and the Eglinton stations also on the Yonge-University-Spadina subway line. Motorists can be downtown in ten minutes via the Bayview extension which also links up with the Don Valley Parkway and a myriad of commuter highways.
Description provided by Torontoneighbourhoods.net
Leaside is located in Toronto Real Estate Board District C11.
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Leslieville

The green and white Leslieville street signs that run along Queen Street were installed in 1987. These historic markers are symbolic of a renewed interest and pride in Leslieville among the residents of this quiet east end neighbourhood. Leslieville, still feels very much like a small village. It's cozy houses, quaint stores, and tree lined streets, seem surprisingly serene and peaceful considering Leslieville's close proximity to downtown Toronto.

Leslieville's older houses along Queen Street, and south to Eastern Avenue were built in the late 1800's. They include Ontario Cottages, Second Empire row houses and Victorian houses. Leslieville's second generation of houses, north of Queen Street, were built in the early 1900's. This district includes modest detached and semi-detached houses as well as a large number of bungalows, that are among the tiniest houses in Toronto. Leslieville's main shopping district runs along historic Queen Street. Most of these stores are small independently owned shops that cater to the specific needs of the local residents. The area on Gerrard Street East between Greenwood Avenue and Coxwell Avenue is known as the ïIndia Bazaar'. This is the commercial centre of Toronto's East Indian community. The smell of incense and the sound of music provide an exotic backdrop to the shops on this street. The clothing stores sell imported silk fabrics, and the restaurant vendors barbecue spicy corn on the cob out on the sidewalk. Greenwood Park has three baseball diamonds, an artificial ice rink, a pool, and a playground. The Jonathan Ashbridge Park on the south side of Queen Street features two tennis courts, a children's playground, and a wading pool. The S.H. Armstrong Community Recreation Centre on Woodfield Road, has a gymnasium, an indoor pool, a fitness room, a craft room and meeting rooms. The Gerrard/Ashdale Public Library has a wide variety of programs for children, adults and seniors. Leslieville is well served by the public transit system which operates bus or streetcar routes on Carlaw, Jones, Greenwood, Coxwell, and Eastern Avenues, as well as Queen and Gerrard Streets. Most of these bus routes link up with stations on the Bloor-Danforth subway line. Motorists can be downtown in minutes. Lake Shore Boulevard, the Gardiner Expressway and the Don Valley Parkway are also close by.
Description provided by Torontoneighbourhoods.net
Leslieville is located in Toronto Real Estate Board District E01.
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Liberty Village

Little Portugal

Little Portugal is a neighbourhood and ethnic enclave in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. It is located west of downtown in the "Old" City of Toronto. It is bound on the west by Lansdowne Avenue, on the north by College Street, on the east by Ossington Avenue and on the south by the Go Transit and Union Pearson Express railway tracks. The area is mainly residential, with Portuguese businesses along Dundas Street West and College Street. The area to the east of Dufferin and south of Dundas Street is also known as "Beaconsfield Village". Characterized by the vibrant and colourful Portuguese community that still makes up a large part of its population, Toronto’s Little Portugal neighbourhood is one of the city’s most active and exciting areas. Mixed with Italian, Brazilian and, increasingly, Asian populations, the area is also becoming home to a growing number of young professionals and artists as this part of Toronto hosts a growing segment of the city’s cutting-edge artistic community. Little Portugal also encompasses the urban oasis of Beaconsfield Village, with its quiet, leafy streets. But the whole of the neighbourhood has become a highly sought after destination for young professionals, especially those with families, and artists who have followed the migration of many of the galleries and nightclubs westward along Queen. The many beautiful houses range from the Gothic and Victorian semi-detached and rowhouses near Dundas to the larger two- and three- storey homes near Queen. And as a few luxury condo projects have taken root, the tree-lined streets have become even more attractive to those seeking Old World charm while remaining easily connected to the ultra-modern city.

Long Branch

Lytton Park

Lytton Park is one of Toronto's most exclusive neighbourhoods. It is home to doctors, lawyers, stockbrokers and corporate executives who value Lytton Park's quiet charm, and its convenient access to transportation corridors leading in and out of the city.

Lytton Park's other assets include beautiful homes on large lots, outstanding recreational facilities, and a close proximity to excellent public and private schools. Lytton Park is comprised of an area encompassing Yonge Street on the east to roughly a half block west of Mona Drive, where the former municipal boundaries of Old Toronto and North York aligned. Lytton Park public schools are a big drawing card. These schools include the highly regarded: John Ross Robertson elementary school, Glenview Middle school and Lawrence Park Collegiate High School. Havergal College girls private school and Blessed Sacrament catholic school are also drawing cards for families looking to move into this neighbourhood. The streetscape in this established neighbourhood is graced by a mature tree canopy. This green backdrop shades beautiful brick: Georgian, Colonial, American Foursquare, Victorian and Tudor style homes that were built mostly between 1920 and 1945. Most lots are 40 or 50 feet wide with varying depths. Almost all the houses are detached and most have garages. These houses start at one million dollars and can go as high as four million dollars. Lytton Park is a pedestrian friendly neighbourhood with excellent convenience to amenities. Popular shops and restaurants abound on Yonge Street and Avenue Road and along Eglinton Avenue which are all within walking distance. Pusateri’s Fine Foods on Avenue Road, and Sporting Life on Yonge Street are destination points. Plenty of coffee shops and boutique independent retailers as well as national brands like The Gap, Roots, and Lululemon are part of the shopping mix. Lytton Park residents enjoy the annual spring fun fair at John Ross Robertson Public School. JRR parents always look forward to special school events such as lip sync night and winter skating and hot chocolate day at Otter Creek. The JRR playing field is a hub for community activities such as T-ball and softball. Glenview Public School is a popular venue for tobogganing in winter and childrens camps in the summer. The Lawrence Park Collegiate playing fields and running track are used year round by the community. Lytton Park, from which this neighbourhood takes its name, is nestled in a deep valley, hidden by trees, from the roaring traffic of Avenue Road above. This serene park includes three public tennis courts, and is also home to the North Toronto Lawn Bowling Club. Across from Lytton Park is the Herbert Begg Memorial Garden. This picturesque strolling garden was donated to the City by Herbert Begg's daughters as a memorial to their father. Business executives, stockbrokers, doctors, lawyers, and University of Toronto professors are all attracted to this neighbourhood as it is a very convenient twenty minute commute either by car or public transit to downtown Toronto's financial, business, medical and university districts. Highway 401 is just five minutes north of the neighbourhood connecting you to all parts of greater Toronto. Both the Eglinton and the Lawrence subway stations, located on Yonge Street, are within walking distance of many Lytton Park houses. Yonge street and Avenue Road both have bus routes that connect to the Yonge subway line. Motorists can be downtown in fifteen minutes. For commuters heading out of the city by car, the Yonge Street and Avenue Road on-ramps to Highway 401 are approximately five minutes from Lytton Park.
Description provided by Torontoneighbourhoods.net
Lytton Park is located in Toronto Real Estate Board District C04.
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Midtown Toronto

Midtown Toronto is an affluent business area, contained in Old Toronto. Located between Downtown Toronto and Uptown Toronto, its borders are roughly defined Bloor Street to the south and Lawrence Avenue to the north, Bayview Avenue to the east and Marlee Avenue/Oakwood Avenue/Ossington Avenue to the west. The central neighbourhood of the area is Yonge and Eglinton. It also covers North Toronto and Forest Hill.  encompasses the area east of Yonge Street to the west side of Bayview Avenue, and south from Eglinton to Merton Street, overlooking the vast park-like setting of Mount Pleasant Cemetery. It is one of the most sought-after neighbourhoods in Toronto, and is home to many residential high-rise apartments and boutique shops. Its many large Victorian and Tudor homes are among the most expensive residences in the city.

Mimico

Mississauga

Moore Park

Moore Park is surrounded on all sides by natural barriers. To the north is the Mount Pleasant Cemetery, to the south is the Park Drive Ravine and the railway tracks, to the east is the Moore Park Ravine and to the west is the Vale of Avoca Ravine. With so much nature at its doorstep, it is not surprising that Moore Park is one of Toronto's most sought after neighbourhoods.

Moore Park includes primarily English Cottage, Georgian, and Tudor-style houses built between 1908 and 1930. There are also a fair number of townhomes built in the 1970s and 1980s and a growing number of new custom homes. Moore Park lots vary in size but are generally quite large. Fifity foot frontages are the norm on the more exclusive streets. The streets are lined with a mature tree canopy and many of the houses back onto one of the ravines that skirt this neighbourhood. The combibation of outstanding architecture and pretty greenspace make Moore Park one of Toronto's most beautiful neighbourhoods. Moore Park also contains many newer townhouses as well as a fair number of duplex and multi-plex homes. For such a high end neighbourhood it is somewhat surprising that many of the houses have shared rather than private driveways. However, the streets are so quiet and uncluttered that parking is not a problem. Moore Park residents do most of their shopping at either the Yonge and St. Clair or the Mount Pleasant and Davisville shopping districts. Both these areas are well known for their gourmet food shops and fine dining. Moore Park residents who live in the more secluded south-east pocket of the neighbourhood can walk across a railway overpass to the small collection of neighbourhood stores on Summerhill Avenue. Nature and fitness enthusiasts will enjoy the Moore Park Ravine foot path, an 8 kilometre trail that passes through the Rosedale Ravine, the Mt. Pleasant cemetery, and the old Don Valley brickworks. Moorevale Park, one block east of Mount Pleasant Road, has five tennis courts, a baseball diamond, and a wading pool. For movie-goers Moore Park is close to a number of theatres on Yonge Street, Eglinton Avenue, and Mount Pleasant Road. Moore Park has bus service on St. Clair Avenue, Mount Pleasant Road and Moore Avenue. The Yonge and St. Clair subway station is within walking distance of many Moore Park houses. Motorists have quick access via Moore Avenue to both the Bayview Extension and the Don Valley Parkway.
Description provided by Torontoneighbourhoods.net
Moore Park is located within Toronto Real Estate Board District C09.
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Moss Park

Moss Park is one of Toronto's largest public housing projects. It is situated in the poorest part of the city. The Salvation Army Hostel is located across the street from Moss Park at the corner of Sherbourne and Queen Street.

The Moss Park neighbourhood is anchored on the west side by a large public park which also happens to be the home of the Moss Park Armoury, a training centre for the Canadian Armed Forces. Moss Park has three double wing high-rise apartment buildings and one single-tower apartment building. All the apartment buildings are well set-back from the street. They are surrounded both by greenspace and by an internal network of roadways that discourage outside traffic from entering the neighbourhood. There is local shopping on both Sherbourne and Parliament Streets. Queen Street East is an eclectic mix of local stores, and design and decorating stores that draw shoppers from Toronto's more affluent neighbourhoods. The Moss Park apartment buildings contain their own recreation centre, as well as an outdoor basketball court, and a children's playgrounds. Moss Park situated to the west of the neighbourhood apartment buildings Ü is one of Toronto's larger parks. It includes a sports field, a baseball diamond, and two tennis courts. Moss Park is located right next to the John Innes Community Recreation Centre. This modern recreational facility features an indoor swimming pool, a gymnasium, a running track, a weight room, a cardio training room, a games room, a woodworking shop, and a craft room. Next door to the community centre is the Moss Park Arena. There are a number of public transportation routes within the Moss Park neighbourhood, including the Queen Streetcar, and bus service on Sherbourne Street and Parliament Street. These surface routes connect to stations on the Bloor-Danforth and the Yonge-University-Spadina subway lines.
Description provided by Torontoneighbourhoods.net
Moss Park is located in the Toronto Real Estate Board District C08.
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Mount Dennis

Mount Dennis is primarily located along between the and the . The area gets its name from the Dennis family (led by John Dennis (1758–1832)), shipbuilders who owned the property, as well as a boatyard on the Humber, at the turn of the 19th century.[] It remained largely rural, with orchards, gravel and clay pits and a few .[] Canada moved its factory to a site at Eglinton Avenue and Weston Road, along the rail line running next to Weston Road, in 1913. This factory complex, known as "", was a major employer for Mount Dennis' residents until it was shut down in 2005. The area became what urban geographer Richard Harris described as an "unplanned suburb" in his book, Unplanned Suburbs: Toronto's American Tragedy 1900 to 1950. Workers at Kodak and the nearby stockyards once located at Weston Road and , as well as , Overland and other factories north and south of Mount Dennis built their own homes before municipal services were in place, and small developers built "infill" homes, gradually filling the streets with the current housing stock of former cottages and small, fully detached homes, among the most affordable housing stock in Toronto for first-time homeowners.

Mount Pleasant East

Mount Pleasant West

Newtonbrook West

Niagara

Niagara — named for the fact that Niagara Street runs through the middle of the area — is one of the most desirably located neighbourhoods in Toronto. Adjacent to the Fashion District, Trinity-Bellwoods and Liberty Village, Niagara not only offers easy access to much of the city’s culture and business, it affords easy access to green space and to the hi-tech industry that has flourished nearby. And with lofts and luxury condos taking over many of the historic industrial buildings that dot the area, Niagara is increasingly becoming a hot spot for those seeking high-end living in an area that combines the feel of a small neighbourhood with the excitement of the vibrant large city that surrounds it. Bordered by Queen Street West to the north, Strachan Avenue to the west, the CN and CP railways to the south and Bathurst Street to the east, Niagara is a neighbourhood that originated as a military garrison, established there for the original city of York. That garrison, Fort York, is still standing in the neighbourhood. A century later in the 1850s, the neighbourhood emerged as centre of Toronto industry, with mills and factories springing up, followed by a rapid expansion of housing for the workers. Today, much of the housing in the area consists of those original houses from the 1800s, or, increasingly, the original factories converted into luxury condos and lofts. As well as its proximity to several of the city’s most desirable neighbourhoods, Niagara residents are also able to enjoy the pleasures of two of Toronto’s most interesting and varied streets: Queen and King. Queen West provides a vibrant mix of art galleries, bookstores, clothing stores, antique stores and markets, while King West contains several leading restaurants. And as well as easy access to Trinity-Bellwoods Park, Niagara also has its own popular green spaces, especially Stanley Park, with swimming, athletic and dog-walking facilities.

North Toronto

When the expanded Toronto Mega City was formed in 1998 the North Toronto neighbourhood went from being located at the north end of the old city to occupying a central location within the new city boundaries. Despite these changes North Toronto's identity as a neighbourhood endures. North Toronto is especially popular with families raising school-age children. It has everything families are looking for in a neighbourhood including good size houses, an excellent selection of public, private and separate schools, convenient access to Toronto's transit system, and a multitude of parks and recreational facilities.

Yonge-Eglinton in North Toronto has been identified as such thanks to its excellent public transit access where jobs, housing and services are all concentrated in a dynamic, mixed-use setting. Yonge and Eglinton - affectionately referred as “Young and Eligible” - has been an important intersection for over a hundred years. North Toronto's housing stock includes bungalows, as well as semi-detached and fully detached houses, built mostly between 1910 and 1940. North Toronto houses are well maintained and a pride of ownership is painted on the face of every home. North Toronto also contains a large number of low and high-rise apartment buildings centred around the Yonge and Eglinton area. These apartment buildings range from luxury condominiums, to affordable co-ops and a wide range of rental opportunities. Blythwood Road is designated by the City of Toronto as a Heritage Conservation District. The charming houses that line this street include fine examples of Victorian, Georgian, Edwardian and Arts and Crafts architecture. These houses sit proudly on large lots some of which back onto ravineland. The tree canopy and expanse of this street along with the architecture of the houses makes this one of the most noteworthy and pretty streets in Toronto. North Toronto residents patronize the local shops and restaurants on Yonge Street, between Eglinton and Lawrence Avenues. The mix of stores on Yonge Street is very diverse, ranging from mom and pop owner-operated stores, to international chain stores; that have added a certain lustre to the entire area. Indoor shopping is available nearby at the Yonge and Eglinton Centre, which has recently undergone a major renovation and expansion. The Yonge and Eglinton corridor has been coined 'Young and Eligible' due to the many bars, restaurants, nightclubs, and movie theatres, that proliferate at this intersection. The ultra-modern North Toronto Community Centre is located on Eglinton Avenue, just east of Avenue Road. This centre includes a gymnasium, squash courts, a walking track, and a water slide. Adjacent to the community centre is Eglinton Park which has sports fields, a baseball diamond, a wading pool, a children's playground, and tennis courts that become an artificial ice rink in the wintertime. Sherwood Park, located east of Mount Pleasant Road, has a wonderful walking path highlighted by some of the oldest and largest trees in the city. This park contains a picturesque children's playground and a wading pool. The Northern District Public Library, on Orchard View Boulevard, offers programs for both children and adults. North Toronto has bus routes on Eglinton Avenue, Mount Pleasant Road, Yonge Street and Avenue Road. All of these surface routes connect to Eglinton station on the Yonge-University-Spadina subway line. Motorists can be downtown in ten minutes. Highway 401, and the Allen Expressway are both approximately ten minutes from North Toronto.
Description provided by Torontoneighbourhoods.net
North Toronto is located in Toronto Real Estate Board District C03, C04, C10 and C12.
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O'Connor - Parkview

O'Connor–Parkview is a neighbourhood in the East York area of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. While the name is taken from the definition used by the city of Toronto, local residents are more familiar with the niche areas that define the larger neighbourhood. It is a very diverse neighbourhood that includes English and Greeks in the west to the Tamil speakers in the east. It includes low-income highrises, to huge property lots. The smaller areas included inside the neighbourhood are Topham Park, Woodbine Gardens and Parkview Hills. Located southeast of the Don Valley, the neighbourhood is bordered on the South by Taylor-Massey Creek (which flows west into the Don), to the east by Victoria Park Avenue and to the north by Holland Avenue. Topham Park represents the upper East side of this neighbourhood and could well be described as quaint. A quick trip through the neighbourhood (which is all it takes) and you will see Topham Park, many residents enjoying their front parks and a very consistent feel. The rising tide in Toronto real estate fortunes over the years does not seem to have affected the style of this neighbourhood. Woodbine Gardens, located south of Topham Park (they border on St.Clair) is bordered to the south by Taylor-Massey Creek (Don). The houses range from bungalows, two story houses all the way to high-rise affordable housing units. The high rise units which oversee the former golf course give onlookers a view at the relatively large properties in the area. Parkview Hills, while significantly north of the Danforth, boasts a large Greek community. Parkview Hills, like most of O'Connor Parkview, has a large mix of ethnicity, income levels and housing types. The property values in this niche area continue to far surpass (on average) those in the rest of the neighbourhood. Property sizes are quite large and more recent work on these homes have boosted their value over the past 10 years. This area is considered the "Rosedale" of the former borough of East York.

Oakwood

Old Town Toronto

Palmerston - Little Italy

Little Italy is not an exclusively Italian neighbourhood, as its name might suggest. While there is still a strong Italian community in this neighbourhood, there is also a large Portuguese population centred around the First Portuguese Canadian Cultural Centre on College Street, and the Portugal Village shopping district on Dundas Street West. Today, Little Italy's Italian and Portuguese residents are welcoming new neighbours from around the world to what is now considered one of Toronto's most multi-cultural neighbourhoods.

The majority of Little Italy's row-houses and attached Victorian homes were built between 1880 and 1910. These houses are set on narrow tree-lined streets with parking facilities located at the back of the property, off a rear laneway. The Little Italy shopping district on College Street, between Shaw Street and Euclid Avenue, features authentic Italian restaurants and European fashions. The Portugal Village shopping district on Dundas Street includes fresh fruit and vegetable markets, mouth-watering bakeries, as well as seafood restaurants, and cafes that feature an authentic Portuguese cuisine. The West End YMCA at 931 College Street, includes a gymnasium, a swimming pool, and community meeting rooms. The First Portuguese Canadian Cultural Centre at 722 College Street, has recently undergone a major renovation/expansion. The centre's facilities include lecture halls, a games room, a bar, meeting rooms, and a restaurant. Evening programs range from performances of Fado music to dances. The College/Shaw Public Library serves as a community meeting place and offers reading material in a number of languages, that reflect the general population of the area. Little Italy is well served by regular bus routes on Ossington Avenue, and streetcar service on College Street, Dundas Street, and Bathurst Street. Motorists are within ten minutes of the Gardiner Expressway and Lake Shore Boulevard.
Description provided by Torontoneighbourhoods.net
Little Italy-Palmerston is located in the Toronto Real Estate Board District C01.
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Parkdale

Parkdale’s eclectic mix of real estate options ranges from grand Victorian mansions to high-rise low rent apartment buildings. This plethora of housing options has resulted in Parkdale having one of the most diverse demographics of any Toronto neighbourhood.

The Parkdale Community Watch recently received an award as the best neighbourhood watch group. This award was presented by the International Society of Crime Prevention. The Parkdale neighbourhood possesses many positive attributes. It has some of Toronto's most vibrant shopping districts, wonderful tree lined streets, affordable Victorian homes, and impressive mansions that remind onlookers that Parkdale was once Toronto's wealthiest district. Parkdale is also within walking distance of Toronto's waterfront parks. South Parkdale's grandiose mansions were built between 1875 and 1895. Some of these houses have been converted into bacherlorettes or rooming houses however the current by laws advocate restoring these houses to single family use. The houses in the north end of Parkdale, above Queen Street, are more modest than their South Parkdale counterparts, but are no less charming. These houses were built between 1900 and 1910. The main commercial shopping area in Parkdale has historically been on Queen Street. This vibrant shopping district seems to be in a state of perpetual activity; it includes an eclectic mix of shops and restaurants. The Roncesvalles Village shopping district, north of Queen Street, is the cultural centre of Toronto's Polish community. There are many outstanding food markets, delis, and restaurants along this route. Parkdale is conveniently located within walking distance of High Park and the recreational paths and parks along Toronto's waterfront. Parkdale has four community centres that serve the residents of this neighbourhood. They include Holy Family Community Centre on Close Avenue, Masryk-Cowan Community Recreation Centre on Cowan Avenue, McCormick Recreation Centre on Sheridan Avenue, and the Parkdale Community Centre on West Lodge Avenue. The Parkdale Public Library on Queen Street and the High Park Public Library on Roncesvalles, both provide programming for Parkdale residents. Streetcar service on Queen Street, King Street, Dundas Street, Roncessvales Avenue, and Macdonell Avenue, connect passengers to the downtown, or to subway stations on the Bloor-Danforth subway line. Motorists are just minutes from downtown. There is direct access to both the Gardiner Expressway and Lake Shore Boulevard, at the south end of Parkdale.
Description provided by Torontoneighbourhoods.net
Parkdale is located in Toronto Real Estate Board District W01.
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Parkwoods

Parkwoods or sometimes referred to as Parkwoods-Donalda is located in the city of Toronto, a geographically large neighbourhood located just south of Ontario Highway 401, West of Victoria Park Avenue, North of Lawrence Avenue East and east of the Don Valley Parkway. The Northern part of the neighbourhood (area north of York Mills Road/Parkwoods Village Drive) is populated by mostly new immigrants to the city and has a mix of lower income and middle income families. The area south of York Mills Road is a fairly affluent neighbourhood, with a large number of original homeowners (1957 to 1962 purchasers) still occupants (or their heirs). In the North West quadrant of the neighbourhood is the area known as Graydon, which is built up on hillside terrains and is home to the Donalda Golf course. One of the dominant characteristics of the neighbourhood is its winding streets and undulating topography. Several large parks and trails can be found throughout the area. Of particular note is Brookbanks Park; a branch of the Don Valley ravine system. Running throughout the ravine is Deerlick Creek, which is a tributary of the Don River.

Playter Estates

Playter Estates is an area in the east end of Toronto, Canada bounded by Jackman Avenue to the east, the Don River Valley to the west, Danforth Avenue in the south, and Fulton Avenue in the north. The neighbourhood is built on land once owned by the Playter family for whom two streets in the area are named. The old farmhouse of the Playter household at 28 Playter Crescent is now the Playter Mansion, which is often used for various films, television shows, and commercials. The neighbourhood is historically Greek, but is increasingly popular among artists and business professionals. The advent of Taste of the Danforth, a weekend long celebration of Danforth Avenue cuisine and culture, has made the area far more popular in recent years. In a 2015 article in Toronto Life, Playter Estates was named Toronto's third-best neighbourhood to live in (based on several criteria, weighted by the magazine writers themselves)

Queen West

Torontonians have always known that the West Queen West neighbourhood is cool and hip and incredibly artsy. Now the whole world knows about West Queen West thanks to a recent Vogue article that identifies the West Queen West neighbourhood as the second coolest neighbourhood in the world. In the late 1800s West Queen West emeraged as a Pacific Railway Hub on the outskirts of the Village of Parkdale. This location was beyond the City limits and had a decidely working class charm. Two of the oldest neighbourhood landmarks are the Drake Hotel and The Gladstone Hotel which are both situated on Queen Street West. These hotels have been dramatically restored and refurbished and today both hotels are prominent pillars in the revitalized West Queen West neighbourhood.

Torontonians have always known that the Queen West neighbourhood is cool and hip and incredibly artsy. Now the whole world knows about West Queen West thanks to a recent Vogue article that identifies the West Queen West neighbourhood as the second coolest neighbourhood in the world. Vogue wrtiter Nick Remsen describes the neighbourhood as "a verifiable artery of indie patisseries, homegrown labels, and hidden-from-view galleries—hallmarks of hipness, if ever they existed." The online article mentions iconic hip neighbourhood landmarks including The Drake and the Gladstone hotels, the Museum of Contemporary Art, Soho House Toronto and Graffiti Alley. West Queen West reflects the young demographic of the neighbourhood. You will find an eclectic retail mix on Queen Street West including fashion boutiques, interior design and furniture shops, antique and vinate stores and a vast array of restaurants reflecting Toronto's multicultural diversity. Trinity-Bellwoods Park is located just to the east of West Queen West north off of Queen Street. There is something going on most weekends in good weather, and enjoyed by neighbouring residence from near and far. The park's facilities include a children's playground, a wading pool, sports fields, a baseball diamond, and four tennis courts. There is also an artificial ice rink that is used for pleasure skating, permit hockey, shinny hockey, women's and girl's ice hockey, and a hockey school. The Trinity Community Recreation Centre at 155 Crawford Street, has an indoor pool, a gymnasium, a track, and a weight room. The Queen Street car is a fixture along the Queen line and makes it pretty enticing to leave your car in the garage. Visit this link and find routes to and from West Queen West. This train also takes you directly to the Eaton's Centre and you can also go all the way East to the Beaches and Leslieville. By car you have easy access to the downtown routes East and West via the Gardiner and Lakeshore which can take you to the 427 North and the DVP North.
Description provided by Torontoneighbourhoods.net
Queen West is located in Toronto Real Estate Board District C01.
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Regent Park

Regent Park residents come from a wide variety of cultural backgrounds including many new Canadians from Africa, Asia, and Latin America. There are more than sixty different first languages spoken here making Regent Park one of Toronto's most culturally diverse neighbourhoods. A promising new chapter in the history of Regent Park is well underway with a revitalization project projected to cost billion and take 15 years to complete. The new Regent Park consists of a mix of market condos, affordable housing units and vibrant new retail and community space. The new Regent Park Community Centre is the hub of this community. In addition to recreational facilities this centre includes an employment centre, a teaching kitchen, community hall, meeting rooms and a rooftop garden. The centre is attached to the Nelson Mandela Park Public School and the Nelson Mandela Child Care Centre.

Riverdale

Riverdale is the gateway to Toronto's east-end neighbourhoods. It is a large and diverse community that is especially well known for its colourful shopping districts and quaint Victorian homes. This is a high density urban neighbourhood that is also blessed with an abundant of parkland where one can escape the hustle and bustle of big city living. Riverdale Park to the east is one of the largest green spaces in the city. It's steep hills are a favourite of tobogganers. Withrow Park to the west is a neighbourhood hub and meeting place with a popular farmers market. Top ranked schools, great shopping and convenient access to transit have attracted many families to this popular neighbourhood.

Riverdale's two and three storey Victorian houses were built largely between 1880 and 1924. These homes are shaded by some of the tallest maple trees in the city. The houses in South Riverdale are on average smaller, older and less expensive than those in North Riverdale. Most of Riverdale's homes have parking off rear laneways, and permits are available for street parking. Riverdale's best known shopping district is along Danforth Avenue, east of Broadview. The Danforth is the heart of Toronto's Greek community. It features many first class Greek restaurants and a dazzling array of stores. Riverdale also has a Chinatown shopping district centred around Gerrard and Broadview. This stretch of stores is known for its bakeries, grocery stands, and restaurants. Another shopping destination point for Riverdale residents is Queen Broadview Village. This historic shopping district includes some interesting antique and collectible stores. Gerrard Square located at the corner of Pape Avenue and Gerrard Street is a large indoor shopping mall with over 70 stores. Riverdale has a myriad of parks and parkettes situated throughout the neighbourhood. The three largest parks are Riverdale Park East, Withrow Park and Jimmie Simpson Park. Each of these Parks contain tennis courts, a wading pool, a hockey rink, and a baseball diamond. Riverdale Park also has an outdoor pool and a running track. The Jimmie Simpson Recreation Centre has an indoor swimming pool, a games room and a gymnasium. The Pape Recreational Centre has a gymnasium, an indoor pool, a weight room and meeting rooms. Riverdale has four public libraries that offer a myriad of programs for children, adults and seniors. Riverdale is an ideal location for commuters. The Don Valley Expressway, Lake Shore Boulevard, and the Gardiner Expressway are all quickly accessed from this neighbourhood. Riverdale also has excellent access to public transit. There is regular bus service or streetcar service on Broadview, Carlaw, Jones and Greenwood Avenues, as well as Queen and Gerrard Streets. The Bloor-Danforth subway has five stations serving Riverdale, including Broadview, Chester, Pape, Donlands, and Greenwood.
Description provided by Torontoneighbourhoods.net
Riverdale is located in Toronto Real Estate Board District E01.
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Roncesvalles

Roncesvalles is known for its European ambience and small-town feel.This neighbourhood is popular with young families who appreciate the convenience of the location just west of downtown.The close proximity to High Park, Toronto waterfront bicycle and walking trails, easy access to public transit, and the Roncesvalles shops and restaurants are also popular drawing cards.

The Roncesvalles Polish Festival,which takes place annually in September,attracts thousands of visitors. Roncesvalles Avenue is closed off for this festival that includes Polish dancers,children's games and rides,polka bands and lots of food and refreshments. Roncesvalles Avenue is said to be a favourite among streetcar enthusiasts,who relish the fact that the stops are distanced far enough apart for the streetcar to build up some speed,and who appreciate the picturesque and lively atmosphere along the route. Roncesvalles Village is brimming with beautiful turn-of-the-century homes that are accented with whimsical architectural details. Pretty front porches and well tended gardens compliment the pretty houses. A lush and mature tree canopy make for a very pleasing streetscape. Most of the houses are attached or semi-deatched with a sprinkling of detached houses. Garages are tucked away out of sight at the rear of the house off laneways. High Park is a short walk west of this neighbourhood. Visitors to this park can engage in a myriad of sport opportunities,from tennis to fishing in Grenadier Pond.There is also a popular children's playground and a zoo. Walkers, joggers and nature enthusiasts will enjoy the many trails that traverse this park. Local parks include Sorauren Park,at the northeast corner of Sorauren and Wabash, and the Charles G.Williams Park at the southeast corner of Sorauren and Wabash.The Keele Community Centre on Glenlake Avenue has an indoor pool.High Park Library on Roncesvalles Avenue offers programs for children and adults. Streetcar service is available on Queen Street, Dundas Street and Roncesvalles Avenue, with stops at numerous subway stations along the Yonge-University-Spadina and Bloor-Danforth lines.The Lansdowne bus stops at the Lansdowne subway station on the Bloor-Danforth line. Go Transit has a station at the Crossways, on the north-east corner of Bloor Street West and Dundas Street West. Commuters can access Union Station from this line. Motorists are approximately a 15-minute drive from the downtown core.
Description provided by Torontoneighbourhoods.net
Roncesvalles is located in the Toronto Real Estate Board District W01.
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Rosedale

For over one hundred years Rosedale has held the distinction of being Toronto's most fashionable address. Many of Toronto's wealthiest and most prominent citizens reside in the Rosedale neighbourhood. Rosedale is unique in that it is surrounded by beautiful ravines and parkland that make you feel as if you are far away from the city, while in reality Rosedale is just a few minutes from Toronto's major business, entertainment, and shopping districts.

Rosedale's Victorian, Georgian, Tudor, and Edwardian style mansions were built between 1860 and 1930. Many Rosedale homes are listed on the Toronto Historical Board's Inventory of Heritage Properties. South Rosedale also contains a number of condominium, co-operative, and co-ownership apartment buildings. These apartments are surprisingly affordable and provide a good entry into the neighbourhood. Rosedale residents living west of Mount Pleasant Road are within walking distance of the upscale shops and restaurants, located on Yonge Street, in the Summerhill area. North Rosedale residents, east of Mount Pleasant Road, can obtain all of their household needs within a small commercial block on Summerhill Avenue, at the very north end of Rosedale. Rosedale is traversed by a network of ancient ravines, including the Vale of Avoca, Moore Park, Park Drive and Rosedale Valley ravines. The beautiful trails in these ravines are enjoyed by nature, and fitness enthusiasts alike. Access points to Rosedale's ravine trails are located at designated spots throughout the neighbourhood. Rosedale Park, located off Schofield Avenue, has eight tennis courts, a sports field, an artificial ice rink, and a wading pool. Ramsden Park, off Yonge Street, features four tennis courts, an artificial ice rink, and a wading pool. Mooredale House, at 146 Crescent Road, is a community centre run by the Rosedale and Moore Park resident associations. There is a small annual fee to join Mooredale, which offers sports, fitness, arts, and music programs for adults and children. Rosedale buses run on South Drive, Crescent and Glen Roads, as well as Summerhill, Maclennan, Highland and Elm Avenues. The Rosedale buses connect with the Rosedale station on the Yonge-University-Spadina subway line or the Sherbourne station on the Bloor-Danforth subway line. Motorists are just minutes away from the Don Valley Parkway.
Description provided by Torontoneighbourhoods.net
Rosedale is located in Toronto Real Estate Board District C09.
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Scarborough Village

Seaton Village

Seaton Village is a centrally located family oriented neighbourhood. Remarkably, this neighbourhood has managed to maintain the feel of a small town village, even though it is situated in a busy part of the city. The focal point of this neighbourhood is Vermont Square. This city park is the home of the St. Alban's Boys' and Girls' Club, a community agency that offers children and families a variety of social and recreational programs.

Bloor Street from Bathurst Street west to Christie Street is the home of Toronto's Koreatown retail corridor. This vibrant shopping area is highlighted by a number of Korean restaurants, Karaoke bars, and Korean food and gift shops. The Bloor Street shopping area east of Bathurst Street is brimming with trendy restaurants, cafes and nightclubs that attract students from the nearby University of Toronto, as well as a diverse mix of people from all over the city. The Bathurst Street shopping area has more of a quieter, residential tone than Bloor Street. It includes small cafes, and professional offices and stores that are geared towards the local home-owners. The Dupont and Christie intersection is anchored by a large national grocery store chain that has just recently moved into the neighbourhood. Vermont Square is located right in the centre of the Seaton Village neighbourhood. This lush city park is lined with trees, and includes a children's playground and a wading pool. This park is also home to the St. Albans Boys' and Girls' Club which has a myriad of programs for families and children including preschool programs, a summer camp, a games room, a computer room, a weight room, a gymnasium, and much more. Christie Pits Park, located at the corner of Bloor and Christie Streets, is one of Toronto's busiest parks. Its facilities include baseball diamonds, an artificial ice rink, a children's playground, an outdoor pool, and a wading pool. Seaton Village is well served by public transit. Most homes are within walking distance of the Bathurst or Christie subway stations on the Bloor-Danforth subway line, or the Dupont station on the Yonge-University-Spadina subway line. There is also bus service on Christie and Dupont Streets and streetcar service on Bathurst Street.
Description provided by Torontoneighbourhoods.net
Seaton Village is located in the Toronto Real Estate Board District C02.
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Sherwood Park

Sherwood Park is defined by its majestic park, ravine, and family-friendly homes, Sherwood Park is a gentle haven in central Toronto for those who love nature, as well as the convenience of urban amenities.

Located in North Toronto and often considered to be Lawrence Park South, the Sherwood Park neighbourhood is a nature lover’s dream. Hidden within the bustle of the urban centre, the park after which the neighbourhood is named has 16 hectares of natural beauty. Benefits of living in Sherwood Park include a strong residents’ association, which gives the community a voice to preserve what they love most about their area. And all of this wonder is within walking distance of a major shopping and entertainment corridor: the Yonge-Eglinton shopping district. The popular upscale fine food emporium Summerhill Market has an outlet here, and also a glorious flower shop across the road. Sherwood Park is located in Toronto Real Estate Board District C10.
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South Hill

South Riverdale

St Andrew - Windfields

St. Andrew-Windfields, is part of the prestigious Bayview Ave/York Mills neighbourhood in Toronto. St. Andrew is one of the most desired neighbourhoods of the rich and the famous in Canada and home to the most luxury real estate in Toronto. Being in close proximity to Post Road and the Bridle Path, St. Andrew Windfields is also recognized by many as one of Toronto’s Millionaires’ Rows. The estate sized lots and luxury mansions provide the finest living in Toronto. This area offers the best of both worlds—a city lifestyle in a peaceful country like setting. This county like setting encompasses a variety of parks and golf courses. Many golfers get their thrills at The Rosedale Golf Club and the private Donalda Club. All the major subway and bus routes as well as highways 401, 407 and the 404 are minutes away. Anyone looking for upscale living close to the best schools, hospitals, shopping and Canada’s who’s who will find it in this affluent neighbourhood! Canada’s best shopping centers such as Yorkdale Mall, Bayview Village, Fairview Mall and Shops at Don-Mills are located within minutes of St. Andrew-Windfields.

St James Town

Sandwiched between Bloor Street East in the north, Wellesley in the south, Parliament in the east, and Sherbourne in the west, St. James Town is a small but densely-populated neighbourhood in downtown Toronto. This culturally and ethnically diverse area is a mostly-residential pocket adjoining some areas that are more commercial- and retail-oriented. St. James Town is a friendly, largely residential neighbourhood. A library and community centre provide residents with programs and things to do. Ethnic grocery stores give a taste of home to the area’s large immigrant population. There are relatively few stores and restaurants, but those that are in the neighbourhood are moderately priced. This friendly, community-oriented neighbourhood feels like a small village. It’s a high-density area, and people seem to know their neighbours better than in many other parts of the city. Residents often stop to talk on the street or, in nice weather, sit outside on benches. This is a mostly residential area; there is shopping close by, but not a lot of shops or restaurants within the neighbourhood boundaries.

St Lawrence Market

The St. Lawrence neighbourhood is as old as Toronto itself. In fact the Town of York - the forerunner to the City of Toronto - spanned 10 city blocks that now comprise part of the St. Lawrence neighbourhood. The architecturally significant 19th century Georgian style red and yellow brick buildings that line Front Street harken back to this earlier period. The newer part of the St. Lawrence neighbourhood situated around The Espanade was constructed in the 1970s. These residences contain a nice mix of low rent and subsidized rental accommodation together with co-ops, condominiums and privately owned homes. The St. Lawrence Market, a landmark in Old Downtown Toronto, stands proudly as the home to over 200 food vendors and is frequented by tourists and locals alike. This market founded in 1803, was recently ranked by National Geographic in as the best food market in the world. A family-friendly neighbourhood with residents from mixed incomes and many different cultural backgrounds. A focal point of this neighbourhood is the St Lawrence Community Centre. The community centre shares it's space with Market Lane Public School and the St Lawrence Community Day Care. It offer a full range of programming for families, children, adults and seniors. David Crombie Park across the street from the community centre along The Esplanade provides residents with plenty of greenspace and recreation. The St.Lawrence neighbourhood has been critically acclaimed as a major success story in urban planning. It has become a model for the design and planning of new neighbourhoods across North America.

Summerhill

Summerhill's turn of the century houses, winding tree-lined streets, and abundance of parkland have made it one of Toronto's most preferred neighbourhoods. It is conveniently located along the Yonge Street corridor, providing Summerhill residents with easy access to Toronto's downtown business and entertainment districts.

Summerhill's original housing stock consists of semi-detached and detached Victorian houses, and detached Edwardian style houses, built between 1880 and 1915. Many of these houses do not include driveways, however permit street parking is available from the city for a nominal annual fee. Summerhill also contains a large number of modern townhouses, and a handful of low-rise luxury condominium apartment buildings, built mostly in the 1980's and 1990's. Summerhill's original housing stock consists of semi-detached and detached Victorian houses, and detached Edwardian style houses, built between 1880 and 1915. Many of these houses do not include driveways, however permit street parking is available from the city for a nominal annual fee. Summerhill also contains a large number of modern townhouses, and a handful of low-rise luxury condominium apartment buildings, built mostly in the 1980's and 1990's. The Rosehill Reservoir Park is located east of Yonge Street, with access from Summerhill Gardens. The lower portion of this park features a foot path that is used by walkers, joggers, and cyclists. The north-east corner of this path leads to the David A. Balfour Park, a nature trail that winds through the Vale of Avoca Ravine. The upper portion of the Rosehill Reservoir Park includes a childrenÍs playground, a wading pool, a waterfall, and reflecting pools. Lionel Conacher Park, situated off Birch Avenue, is a memorial to Lionel Conacher who was CanadaÍs athlete of the first half of the twentieth century. Conacher, who grew up in the Summerhill neighbourhood, played on two Toronto Maple Leaf Stanley Cup teams. He also competed at the highest level in a dozen other sports and served in the Ontario Legislature, as well as the House of Commons. The Summerhill subway station on the Yonge-University-Spadina subway line is within walking distance of every home in this neighbourhood. Located along the Yonge Street corridor, Summerhill provides motorists with easy access to the downtown core and to major highways.
Description provided by Torontoneighbourhoods.net
Summerhill is located in Toronto Real Estate Board District C02.
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Swansea

Swansea Village is the only Toronto neighbourhood that has its own community run Town Hall. Swansea is also the only Toronto neighbourhood to have a lake, a river, and a pond as it's natural boundaries. Swansea's hilly terrain, winding roads and many mature trees accentuate the storybook houses that line the residential streets of this neighbourhood.

Swansea Village is the only Toronto neighbourhood that has its own community run Town Hall. Swansea is also the only Toronto neighbourhood to have a lake, a river, and a pond as it's natural boundaries. Swansea's hilly terrain, winding roads and many mature trees accentuate the storybook houses that line the residential streets of this neighbourhood. The most convenient shopping district for Swansea residents is the Bloor West Village shopping district on Bloor Street West. Bloor West Village features Toronto's best selection of European bakeries and delis. The Swansea Town Hall and Community Centre includes a small gymnasium, and a selection of meeting rooms available for a variety of functions. Swansea Town Hall is also the home of the Swansea Memorial Public Library, the smallest branch of the Toronto Public Library system. This branch specializes in material for children and seniors and provides complete inter-library loan services. Rennie Park, located on the east side of Rennie Terrace, south of Morningside Avenue, has four tennis courts, an artificial ice rink, and a wading pool. High Park which can be accessed from Bloor Street, features a full day of recreational activities including fishing, theatre performances, train rides, an animal zoo, historical exhibits, a restaurant and a myriad of fitness opportunities. Swansea is served by a bus route on Windermere and Morningside Avenues. The Runnymede and Jane subway stations on the Bloor-Danforth subway line are within walking distance of many of the houses in this neighbourhood. Motorists enjoy the convenience of being located only minutes away from the Gardiner Expressway and Lake Shore Boulevard.
Description provided by Torontoneighbourhoods.net
Swansea is located in the Toronto Real Estate Board District W01.
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The Beach

Please Note: A long standing debate has ensued over the proper name for this neighbourhood. Some refer to it as The Beach, others as the Beaches. To be politically correct use The Beach, otherwise both are acceptable.

The Beach looks and feels more like a lakeside resort town, than a big city neighbourhood. In the summertime, thousands of Torontonians and tourists flock to The Beach to walk on The Boardwalk, exercise along the Martin Goodman Trail, relax by the water, or shop and dine at the colourful stores and restaurants along Queen Street. The social centre of The Beach neighbourhood is Kew Gardens, which hosts many annual events including a Christmas Tree and Menorah lighting festival, a Jazz festival, and an Arts and Crafts show. The Beach has the greatest variety of architectural house styles of any Toronto neighbourhood. The charm of these homes is accentuated by the tree-lined streets that wind their way down to the lake. Many of the original frame Beach cottages built in the latter half of the 1800's and the early 1900's, have been modernized and are still standing today. However, the majority of The Beach homes were built during the 1920's and 1930's. The former Greenwood racetrack site located at the foot of Woodbine Avenue is now the site of a large new home development known as The Beach. This large collection of heritage inspired custom built homes will include detached and semi-detached houses, and townhomes. Also included in this mix will be a handful of low-rise condominium apartment buildings. Queen Street is the most commercial of The Beach shopping districts. Many of these stores and restaurants have a beach motif that caters to the tourist trade. The shops on Kingston Road also have a beach flavour, however they attract a more local clientele than the stores on Queen Street. The Beaches' most famous landmark is The Boardwalk. The Boardwalk is skirted by the Martin Goodman Trail which spans the city's waterfront from The Beach to the Humber River. Ashbridge's Bay Park is a good spot for family picnics and windsurfing. Its also a popular spot for beach volleyball. Glen Stewart Park off Queen Street has a picturesque ravine and nature trail. Donald Summerville Pool at the foot of Woodbine Avenue, overlooks the lake and includes an Olympic size pool, a diving pool and a children's pool. Kew Gardens has one of Toronto's most active tennis programs with 10 flood lit courts. This park also has a baseball diamond, an artificial ice rink, a children's playground, a wading pool and a concert bandstand. The Beach Branch of the Toronto Public Library is right next to Kew Gardens, off Queen Street. There are bus or streetcar routes along Queen Street, Kingston Road, Gerrard Street, Victoria Park Avenue, Main Street, and Woodbine Avenue. All these surface routes connect to Toronto's rapid transit lines and subway stations. Motorists have the convenience of being located close to the Don Valley Expressway, the Gardiner Expressway, and Lake Shore Boulevard.
Description provided by Torontoneighbourhoods.net
The Beaches is located in the Toronto Real Estate Board District E03.
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The Bluffs

The Junction

Today, the term "The Junction" is generally applied to the area north of Annette, south of St. Clair, and between Runnymede Road and the Canadian National Railway corridor to the east which intersects with the Canadian Pacific Railway corridor at West Toronto Diamond. The Junction has managed to retain its original small town charm and appeal despite it’s prime location in Toronto’s bustling west end. The Junction is still affordable and appeals to a wide demographic from young families, to artists to urban professionals. This is as true a neighbourhood as you are likely to find in Toronto. It has a strong sense of pride and history, a beautiful main street shopping district on Dundas Street West, cherished local schools, parks and library, and a diverse population that runs the gamut from gentrification to an edgy urban grittiness.

The Kingsway

The Kingsway is a residential neighbourhood of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. It is located in the former City of Etobicoke, an area that became the west end of Toronto upon amalgamation in 1998. It is bounded by Bloor Street to the south, Dundas Street to the north, the Mimico Creek to the west and the Humber River to the east. While the area was first known as "Kingsway Park", popular usage drifted to "The Kingsway", that being the name of the main road which winds through the heart of the area. "The Kingsway" is also the name of the Business Improvement Association business district along Bloor Street. The Kingsway is one of the more affluent areas in Toronto, the 2012 average price of a detached house was ,931,065.For planning purposes the neighbourhood is known officially by the City of Toronto as "Kingsway South" to differentiate it from a more recent extension of The Kingsway north of Dundas Street. "Kingsway South" does not enjoy popular usage owing to confusion with the South Kingsway, a busy street located east of the Humber River and extending south from Bloor Street. The neighbourhood was first developed by Etobicoke lawyer Robert Home Smith who purchased the old King's Mill (which was renamed the Old Mill, reopening as a high-end Inn) and began developing land in the early 1900s. The Kingsway emerged out of Home Smith's vision of the ideal community and was mostly inspired by the Garden City principles, which were originally conceived in parts of England and the United States during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Kingsway Park features tastefully appointed traditional homes sited on well-treed and winding streets, which create an air of a wooded retreat. Kingsway Park was aimed at affluent home buyers. Street names such as Queen Anne Road and Kingsgarden Road emphasized the appearance of English respectability and affluence that Smith was selling. Smith also created the Old Mill Restaurant in the community, whose Tudor Revival facade and well-appointed interior inspired much of the English design in the Kingsway.

Thorncliffe Park

Thorncliffe Park is a densely populated, multicultural neighbourhood in central east Toronto, Ontario, Canada, in the former Borough of East York. Located along the Don River Valley corridor, Thorncliffe Park is a self-contained community that includes its own shopping mall, school, library, park, community centre, churches, and business centre. Thorncliffe Park has traditionally been a starting point for many new Canadians. To help these new residents adjust Thorncliffe Park has its own neighbourhood office, located inside the Thorncliffe Park Plaza. This neighbourhood resource centre provides multilingual, social and recreational programs and services for members of the Thorncliffe Park community.

Thornhill

Toronto Islands

Just a stately 10-minute ferry ride across Toronto’s inner harbour will bring you to another world of quiet, tree-filled picnic spots, car-free streets, quaint old cottages and beachfront attractions. Toronto Islands are made up of three major islands – Centre, Ward’s and Algonquin – with paths, bridges and boardwalks that connect the islands. A quick walk or bike ride takes you to one of four sandy beaches – Centre Island Beach, Gibraltar Point Beach, Hanlan’s Point Beach and Ward’s Island Beach. The most popular spot, especially with families with kids, is Centre Island, which features huge picnic areas, bike paths, a maze, a beach and award-winning gardens. Paddleboats, bicycles and in-line skates are available to rent on the island. You’ll also find Centreville, an amusement park geared towards younger children with some 30 rides, a petting zoo with pony rides and picturesque swan boats circling a small lagoon. Ward and Algonquin Islands feature summer cottages from the 1920s and charming English-style gardens. Hanlan’s Point provides a quiet escape, with an excellent clothing-optional beach and Toronto’s famous haunted lighthouse. Hop aboard one of the three regular ferries that depart from the foot of Bay Street at Queen’s Quay. The view of Toronto’s growing skyline from across the harbour is well worth the trip alone.

Trinity Bellwoods

Trinity Bellwoods is bounded College Street to the North, Bathhurst Street to the East, Queen Street to the South, and Dovercourt Road to the West. The focal point of this inner-city neighbourhood is the very picturesque Trinity-Bellwoods Park, which spans the entire length of the neighbourhood. This park features a paved walking path that is highlighted by distinguished cast iron lamp poles and a lush greenery. In addition to Trinity-Bellwoods Park, this neighbourhood also features affordable Victorian houses, excellent shopping districts, and convenient access to major transportation routes for motorists and pedestrians. Trinity-Bellwoods houses were built largely between 1880 and 1905. They are small to medium in size, and are typical of the Victorian period of architecture found in Toronto's downtown neighbourhoods Many of the houses in this neighbourhood either front or back onto Trinity-Bellwoods Park. Some of Trinity-Bellwoods' larger houses are located on Shaw Street, a pretty tree-lined boulevard that is twice as wide as the other streets in this neighbourhood. Trinity-Bellwoods also contains a handful of interesting lofts that offer an alternative to those seeking a relatively maintenance free lifestyle, with all of the modern amenities. The Portugal Village shopping district on Dundas Street between Grace and Markham Streets, caters to the large Portuguese community in the Trinity-Bellwoods neighbourhood. Queen Street is known for its arts flavour and culinary delights. This part of Queen Street includes galleries, antique shops, bookstores, vegetarian restaurants, natural food markets, fashion and accessory stores and a variety of cafes and restaurants. Ossington Avenue has one of the highest concentrations of bars and restaurants in Toronto reflecting the youthful demographic in this neighbourhood. Cafes, coffee shops, art galleries and hip clothing stores complete the picture on Ossington Avenue. Trinity-Bellwoods Park is located in the centre of this neighbourhood. The park's facilities include a children's playground, a wading pool, sports fields, a baseball diamond, and four tennis courts. There is also an artificial ice rink that is used for pleasure skating, permit hockey, shinny hockey, women's and girl's ice hockey, and a hockey school. The Trinity Community Recreation Centre at 155 Crawford Street, has an indoor pool, a gymnasium, a track, and a weight room. Streetcar service on both Bathurst Street and Ossington Avenue provides regular service to the Bloor-Danforth subway. For motorists travelling in and out of the city there is convenient access to both Lake Shore Boulevard and the Gardiner Expressway, which are each approximately a five minute drive from this neighbourhood. Description provided by Torontoneighbourhoods.net Trinity Bellwoods is located in Toronto Real Estate Board District C01. Interested in homes in the Trinity Bellwoods? Call or email us and we would be happy to discuss the neighbourhood and/or send you a summary of active listings and recent sales.

Upper Beach

Upper Forest Hill

Victoria Village

Victoria Village (sometimes referred to as Sloane) is a quiet, middle-income neighbourhood that is bordered by the East Don River Valley, the Canadian Pacific Railway line, and light industry. Victoria Village is a community in transition as a steady stream of young families from a myriad of cultural backgrounds have begun moving into this affordable neighbourhood. Many of Victoria Park Village's new residents have become active members of the Victoria Park Village Ratepayers Association. This association has been involved in shaping recent developments on the periphery of the neighbourhood as well as working on traffic calming issues and the improvement of local parks. The neighbourhood has many high- and low-rise buildings, which provide affordable living and are located on the edges of the neighbourhood, with mostly bungalows, some semi-detached homes, and some two-storey detached (either rebuilt bungalows, or built after the initial period of construction, which occurred mostly from the late 1950s-1960s). Because the neighbourhood borders the Don River some of the homes have stunning views overlooking the Don Valley. A significant portion of the single detached homes in the area abut valley areas, notably the Charles Sauriol Conservation Reserve

Wanless Park

Wanless Park is a very popular neighbourhood among families with young children. The main attraction is Wanless Park, an island of green space right in the centre of the neighbourhood. Wanless Park residents enjoy the convenience of being able to walk to all the local amenities including the Bedford Park Public School and Community Centre, the George Locke Public Library, Yonge Street shopping and the Lawrence subway station.

Wanless Park's solid brick detached houses were built mostly in the 1930's and 1940's. Most of the houses are two storey, however there is a sprinkling of bungalows in this neighbourhood as well. Overall the property sizes in Wanless Park are excellent with most homes having at least a thirty foot frontage and either a mutual or private driveway. The majority of Wanless Park houses either face the park or back onto the Riverview Drive ravine. Wanless Park is the social and recreational hub of this neighbourhood. Its facilities include five floodlit tennis courts, a baseball diamond, a basketball court, a wading pool, and a children's playground. Indoor recreational facilities are available at the Bedford Park Community Centre, located on Ranleigh Avenue, inside the Bedford Park Public School. This recreation centre has a gymnasium and an indoor pool. The George Locke Public Library at Yonge and Lawrence has a variety of programs for preschoolers, children, and adults. The Lawrence subway station on Yonge Street is within walking distance of this neighbourhood. This station is part of the Yonge-University-Spadina subway line. Bus routes on Mount Pleasant Road and on Lawrence Avenue also make connections to the Yonge subway line. It is approximately twenty minutes by car to downtown Toronto. The Yonge Street on-ramp to Highway 401 is approximately five minutes from Wanless Park.
Description provided by Torontoneighbourhoods.net
Wanless Park is located in the Toronto Real Estate Board District C04.
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Waterfront Communities

Willowdale

A large part of North York, Willowdale is an affluent community centred around Yonge St. from Steeles Ave. down to the 401, and from Bayview to Senlac Rd. It has gained in popularity as its amenities continue to grow and new condo development changes its landscape. It's prized for being located on the subway lines, and offers easy access to all parts of the city. Willowdale is a vibrant and cosmopolitan urban centre filled with luxury condominiums, custom built homes, shining office towers, a newly renovated shopping mall and theatre complex, an ultra modern civic centre, a world-class aquatic centre and a highly acclaimed Centre for the Performing Arts which hosts local and world class entertainment. Willowdale is also the home of the newly rebuilt Earl Haig Secondary School which has an outstanding academic reputation. Earl Haig is also highly regarded for its Claude Watson Arts program where students can major in either dance, drama, music or visual arts.

Willowdale East

Woodbine - Lumsden

Wychwood

Wychwood Park is an exclusive enclave of sixty homes tucked away in a private ravine setting atop the rolling wooded hills of the Davenport Ridge. This community is unique in that it has its own executive council that overseas the private roads and parkland within the Wychwood Park neighbourhood. The price for this privacy is a special park tax paid by every Wychwood Park home owner. This tax varies depending on the size of each property.

All of Wychwood Park's houses are listed on the Toronto Historical Board's Inventory of Heritage Properties. A handful of the first Wychwood Park houses were built in the late 1800's, however most of the houses in Wychwood Park were built in stages between 1906 and 1935. A few houses were also built in the early 1950's. Many of the older Wychwood Park houses were designed by Eden Smith, an architect who specialized in the English Arts and Crafts house style. The influence of Smith's traditional English house forms is evident throughout Wychwood Park. Wychwood Park residents enjoy convenient access to a large number of shops and restaurants along St. Clair Avenue West. There is also a limited amount of convenience-type shopping on Vaughan and Davenport Roads, and on Bathurst Street. Nestled in a thickly wooded valley at the south end of Wychwood Park is the Taddle Creek pond. This pond is home to two swans named Oscar and Felix, as well as snapping turtles, painted turtles, goldfish and mallard ducks. In the wintertime the pond is used as a skating rink. Near the pond is the Wychwood Park tennis court which is so tangled in underbrush that it is barely visible from the street above. The Wychwood Public Library and the Hillcrest Community Centre are both located on Bathurst Street, within a short walk of the Wychwood Park neighbourhood. Both the bus service on Davenport Road and the streetcar on St. Clair Avenue connect passengers to the Dupont station on the Yonge-University-Spadina subway line. The Bathurst bus connects passengers to the Bathurst station on the Bloor-Danforth subway line. Motorists are approximately ten minutes from downtown and about the same distance north to the Allen Expressway off Eglinton Avenue.
Description provided by Torontoneighbourhoods.net
Wychwood Park is located in the Toronto Real Estate Board District C02.
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Yonge & St. Clair

The very "uptown" Yonge and St. Clair intersection would be the envy of any small Canadian city with it's mix of high rise office, apartment and condominium towers coupled with busy street life and a generous mix of retail. Though a walk along either Yonge or St. Clair is very "big city," nearby ravines provide a bucolic escape that make the city seem far away. The Rosehill Reservoir Park has an impressive series of fountains and brooks, including a space-aged atomic sculpture in the centre. Overlooking the city from the top of an escarpment, the affluent neighbourhood surrounding Yonge and St. Clair has some of the best panoramic views in Toronto.

Yonge and Eglinton

York Mills

York Mills is one of Toronto's most affluent neighbourhoods. Its mills are long gone replaced by shining office towers and luxury condominiums. Its main arterial roadways including Yonge Street and Bayview Avenue - which were once impassable by car, now serve as major roadways to and from the city core. Yet, despite all these changes York Mills has managed to maintain a peaceful tranquility and natural beauty that has helped make it one of Toronto's most desirable neighbourhoods. Much like nearby , St. Andrew-York Mills has undergone a massive transformation over the last few decades turning it into a bustling, cosmopolitan urban centre with multi-million dollar custom homes. Its luxury homes and excellent schools attract affluent families including many wealthy newcomers to Canada who choose to call York Mills home. Also like Willowdale, you’ll find that a lot of the homes for sale in North York in the St. Andrew-York Mills area have large, very attractive basement apartments that make ideal nanny apartments or in-law suites. Its prime location next to major arteries in and out of the core and shopping at nearby Bayview Village and York Mills Plaza is also a draw. Residents make use of all the high-end golf courses within a short drive along with exclusive clubs like the nearby Granite Club.

Yorkville

Yorkville is one of Toronto's most dynamic neighbourhoods. It is an eclectic mix of luxury condominium apartment buildings, commercial office towers, four star hotels, theatres, gourmet restaurants, a prestigious shopping district and picture postcard Victorian homes.

The commercial heart of Yorkville is located on both Yorkville Avenue and on Cumberland Street. The transition to Yorkville's quiet residential pocket is gradual, as Victorian houses shift from retail to residential uses in a seamless pattern that is uniquely Yorkville. Yorkville's gentrified Victorian houses were built mainly between 1870 and 1895. These historical homes exhibit many decorative features including ornamental brick patterns, gingerbread gables, cast iron fences, and richly landscaped gardens. Many of Yorkville's houses are listed on the Toronto Historical Board's Inventory of Heritage Properties. Bloor-Yorkville is generally acclaimed as Canada's pre-eminent shopping district. Its many specialty stores, fashion boutiques, jewellery stores, antique shops, and art galleries are a destination point for tourists, as well as Torontonians from all over the city. Yorkville's shops and restaurants are located in pretty Victorian houses on Yorkville Avenue, Hazelton Avenue, Cumberland Street and Scollard Street. The Hazelton Lanes shopping centre located at 55 Avenue Road features over 100 exclusive shops and restaurants. The Village of Yorkville Park located at 115 Cumberland Street has won numerous design awards for its thematic landscape based on elements of Yorkville history as well as the Canadian landscape. The rock in the centre of the park is from the Canadian Shield. It weighs 650 tonnes, and is 1 billion years old. Ramsden Park is located at the north end of Yorkville, off Yonge Street. This large city park includes four tennis courts, an artificial ice rink, a children's playground, and a wading pool. The Yorkville Public Library, at 22 Yorkville Avenue, is an intimate library geared towards the local community. It includes programs for both children and adults. The Metropolitan Toronto Reference Library at 789 Yonge Street is Canada's largest and most extensive reference library. The George R. Gardiner Museum of Ceramic Art, the Royal Ontario Museum, and the McLaughlin Planetarium are all within walking distance of this neighbourhood. The Manulife Centre situated at the south-east corner of Bay and Bloor features 12 state-of-the-art movie theatres. Yorkville is ideally located within walking distance of the Bloor/Yonge subway station on the Yonge-University-Spadina subway line and the Bay station on the Bloor-Danforth subway line. For those commuting by car, the Don Valley Parkway is approximately five minutes from Yorkville.
Description provided by Torontoneighbourhoods.net
Yorkville is located in Toronto Real Estate District C02.
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